600 photos building Oughtred, Redmond, Bear mountain, Storer, CLC, White

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by BOATMIK, Oct 19, 2007.

  1. BOATMIK
    Joined: Nov 2004
    Posts: 294
    Likes: 15, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 190
    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    BOATMIK Deeply flawed human being

    Howdy,

    Just finished helping to instruct at the DuckFlat Spring boatbuilding school in OZ. I took around 600 photos of different steps in the building of the different boats (link below for all pictures)

    [​IMG]

    This time round there are 10 projects - all different - chosen by the builders. Some clinker/lapstrake, some plywood, some stitch and glue, strip planked.

    The designers and boats represented are:
    Storer (ie Me) - Goat Island Skiff, Eureka Canoe
    Oughtred - MacGregor canoe, Acorn Skiff, Feather Pram
    CLC - LT17
    Bear Mountain - Rob Roy
    Redmond - Whisp
    Joel White - Nutshell

    Almost everyone has not built a boat before. A couple from Tasmania have built glassfibre canoes before but have gone classy with the Bear Mountain Rob Roy built in the Chinese lightweight timber Paulownia instead of cedar strips. Cedar has become very expensive so a cheaper alternative is welcome.

    [​IMG]

    Also some pics of Greenland Paddles and some quite pretty plywood bladed paddles with properly designed shafts.

    I hope the pictures prove useful. The reservoir is here
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/boatmik
    - look for the set on the right called, strangely enough,
    Duck Flat Spring Boatbuilding School.

    Best Wishes
    Michael
     
  2. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    Some great work. Must be quite exciting seeing all these boats develop. Clearly some works of art and endless patience.

    Rick W.
     
  3. BOATMIK
    Joined: Nov 2004
    Posts: 294
    Likes: 15, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 190
    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    BOATMIK Deeply flawed human being

    Thankyou Rob!!!

    Actually it is only 9 days of patience -that's how long the class lasted!

    A couple hung on for an extra day. But almost all the work you see happened inside the class time.

    I suspect the main ingredient was perspiration!

    Best wishes
    Michael
     
  4. flyinwall
    Joined: Feb 2008
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    Location: Cooroy Queensland Australia

    flyinwall Junior Member

    Is there a phone number that i can ring or a website i can go to to get more infomation about the boat building school

    Cheers Trevor
     
  5. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Re the strip plank canoe pictures - whats that holding the planks on ?. It looks like a nail with a bit of red plastic tubing.
    Do you have any more details about that please ?
     
  6. BOATMIK
    Joined: Nov 2004
    Posts: 294
    Likes: 15, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 190
    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    BOATMIK Deeply flawed human being

    Google Duckflat or follow the links in the photoset on flickr.

    The nail method for strip planking has some advantages.

    1/ staples leave a number of almost random holes in each plank. A single nail leaves a neat single hole.

    2/ you only ever need one nail because the holding power is so great. We use 50mm (2") flathead nails.

    3/ the plastic tube is sold as a length. In Australia it is called "electrician's spagetti" and sold in hardware stores.

    Its purpose is to evenly put pressure on the timber without denting and hold the head of the nail above the surface for easy removal.

    You have to cut it to length and thread it onto the nails. Generally with cedar we would not bother with the plywood pads but we were worried about whether the soft paulownia timber would get dented.

    If we were doing the boat in cedar or anything harder we would use only the spagetti and forget about the plywood pad.

    There are also plastic staples now which are great if you can afford the machine that bangs them in - it is a bit more expensive than a hammer.

    And, at the least, you can also use a hammer as a screwdriver.

    Best wishes
     

  7. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

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