6’ nano cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Quidnic, Dec 2, 2020.

  1. cracked_ribs
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Location: Republic of Vancouver Island

    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    Would it be so much worse than touring in a kayak? Tons of people do that here.

    On the island where my summer place is, we've got one guy who comes and goes exclusively by kayak, and a couple who come and go by rowboat.

    Granted, the couple are Colin and Julie Angus, who know some things about rowing. But I don't get the opposition here. Dream it, do it, maybe it turns out you hate it but you'll know.

    Wear a life jacket and try it in protected waters to start. What's the problem? My first boat, a little sailing sharpie I designed, I sailed for miles just to look around and enjoy sailing. It was great and I had fun. I was sometimes wet and sometimes cold and sometimes baking in the sun. So what? Most boats are toys. Build what interests you and go play.
     
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  2. Quidnic
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    Location: Wales

    Quidnic Junior Member

    Yes basically a kayak type boat that you can sit and even lay inside and sail.

    but can be used just like a kayak as well
     
  3. Quidnic
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    Location: Wales

    Quidnic Junior Member

    Let’s be clear here, this is not a sea going vessel

    it’s a fun coastal cruiser
     
  4. wet feet
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: East Anglia,England

    wet feet Senior Member

    A six foot boat might be fun for a four foot sailor.The least objectionable tiny "cruisers" I have seen are Matt Layden's and they are around twice the required length.Still not my idea of a fun way to spend a few days,but infinitely better than a tiny coffin.Matts boats http://www.microcruising.com/pictures.htm
     
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  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is a bit of a cult thing, I think, where where size matters, but in reverse.
     
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  6. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Size isn't the problem here. Micro cruisers have their place and I am particularly fascinated by them as an affordable way of participating in an expensive lifestyle. It's about self-sufficiency for me. The problem is with the concept of trapping oneself in what looks like a magician's saw-the-lady-in-half trick, with body in one chamber and head and feet in others with only small holes in the separating bulkheads. Get rid of the bulkheads, if you're gong to sleep on the water while enclosed inside. Remember, Houdini died in a water escape trick.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
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  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Tell me it's a joke, like being in medieval stocks, only at both ends of the body. And never forget, stability scales to the fourth power, so tiny boats that are scaled down versions of larger boats, are excessively tender.
     
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  8. Quidnic
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    Location: Wales

    Quidnic Junior Member

    You wouldn’t need bulkheads if it’s so small and built very well

    quarter inch marine ply with one thin layer of glass fibre and all epoxy
     
  9. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Alternatively Will, Quidnic could simply buy a nice little sailing boat for the cost of building his coffin.
    Such as this Core Sound 17 -
    2013 B & B Yacht Designs Core Sound 17 Sail New and https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/2013/b-b-yacht-designs-core-sound-17-3098659/

    Or this Swift Explorer 18 -
    1975 Swift Explorer 18 Sail New and Used Boats for Sale - https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1975/swift-explorer-18-3716244/

    Or keep an eye open for a Longshore 16 - however not many were built.
    They have a small cabin, which is still about 10 times bigger than Quidnics coffin.
    Longshore 16 - home http://longshore16.com/longshore16.html
     
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  10. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    I thought of that. My own Mariner 19 would serve very well. It is easily launched from most any boat ramp, four berths, 11 inches of draft and a great sailer, but I understand the excitement and the need to try out one's own ideas. My boat cost me $1000 + a $500 main sail and whatever it will eventually cost to fix the broken thru-hull fittings, if I ever get the time. But I would happily spend ten times that amount to see my own ideas launched.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2020
  11. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'd like about a 7'9"(to fit even in standard low 8' ceilings) long by 40" square nosed dingy/dory that could stand straight up on its own, stored inside in the corner of a room. It would have either low profile cross frames spaced about 16" o.c. (or Shelf Standards) able to support removable shelves during the off-season. The approximately 45deg slope of the sides of a dory would be good match for the walls in a room corner, to maximize shelf space. (my interior decorator/designer experts tell me "corners are always tough to do right"). It would have a slightly extended (possibly detachable to retain true dory stacking ability) keel to act as third leg when upright. I guess it would be an OK size for a full grown man to laid down and sleep in. Should have provision for covering with tarp to use for outside storage bin(either upright or laying down), or automobile roof-top cargo pod.

    The idea would be it would be a real hard hulled boat that even an apartment dweller could keep inside their cell without compromising living space.

    But I guess it would also be a pretty good "Nano Cruiser". Due to shape of at least the bows of boats, you are going to need at least a foot past 6' 2" to sleep in.
     
  12. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Self flagellation is a mysterious mind set. On the other hand we can refer to the mantra of the 60s Hippies: If it feels good, do it.
     
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  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Well, the mind does harbour many mysteries, my first impression is that it is a kind of reverse elitism, where you don't try to outdo the other guy with a bigger boat, you beat him by going smaller than he imagined possible. It certainly has the appeal of being easier to finance, than grandiose plans, but utility and safety does seem to shrink alarmingly, as the size decreases. My experience of small boats is that if you want a short boat to handle any sort of semi-open water, you must make the beam the thing that gets chopped down the least, and have full ends. Short length, narrow beam, pointy ends, are the perfect storm of unseaworthiness. You might get away with it in a kayak, but the kayaker is a dynamic element in that equation.
     
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  14. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    I’ve had quite a few wonderful days on the water spoiled by having to rescue fools that set out unprepared for their expedition.
    Jet skis, boaters, kayaks, windsurfers, and even swimmers!
    Sure, do your thing, but be prepared to accept the consequences of your action, and don’t forget that what you choose to do can have effects on others, and how they view you, and how that can reflect on an entire segment of the boating community.
     
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  15. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    That Nesting Dinghy looks about perfect. I like that like my other post ITT it can self-stand upright for easy storage, and the Nester's two ends' hatches remain accessible when nested and standing, so it would also transform into a semi-useful (and interesting) piece of furniture. Also nice that the two ends are water-tight bulk-heads, and that it has 100lbs of (fresh potable?) water ballast. Should include some niffy secondary uses for the big leeboards (gangplank, shelf, cutting board, raised floor, topside sleeping platform, cockpit cover). I'd like to see some pre-engineered schemes to use the sails to make the cockpit rain proof and/or a foul weather tent. And of course provision to add a small gas or electric outboard. Looks like it would be easy to move with handtruck when nested.
     
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