'57 Chris Craft restoration nearing completion, but...

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by markp, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. markp
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    markp Junior Member

    I am close to completing the restoration of my 1957 Chris Craft 28’ Sedan Cruiser with flybridge. It currently has twin in-line 6-cylinder Hercules K engines. This fall I want to replace the engines economically, possibly with readily available remanufactured 283's. I have lots of experience with auto engine rebuilds/retrofits and my goal is simple low-cost retro-fit. Doing a lot of research on this and other great forums, still have a few questions and would appreciate any advice.

    - besides brass plugs, marine gaskets, flame arrester, fuel pump, engine mounts, prop shaft mods, linkage mods, electrical mods, are there other considerations?

    - prefer not to pay the premium for a reverse starboard engine, can I compensate rotation in the transmission?

    - “velvet” or standard Paragon wedge transmission, or other lowest cost option?

    And or course any other advice is greatly appreciated. thanks
     
  2. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Welcome to the Forum Mark.
    I know nothing about the engines that you want to fit - however I wanted to chip in to ask if you could post some photos on here of your restoration as well?
    Including 'before' (early on) and more recent - we all love to read about happy restoration projects. :)
     
  3. markp
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    markp Junior Member

    will do!
     
  4. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    I'm not being critical, I'm curious. Why 283's? I know Chris used them long ago. Most of the GM refit's I see are 454/502, 350 (5.7), 305 (5.0) and the 4.3 V6. Just curious. Along with the accessories you mentioned you might consider....Closed cooling, especially if you plan salt water use. High output marine alternators, marine starters, marine water pumps, new fuel filters, and fuel lines, oil pressure sending units, water temperature sending units. Those are just off the top, I'll come up with more later. On a boat of that vintage I assume the entire electrical system has been upgraded? This would include all engine to helm wiring and/or harnesses?

    Those 6's were rated anywhere from 95 to 175 horsepower. That's a pretty wide spread. I'll take a guess and say you have the 105 or the 131 horsepower version? Assuming that's true be mindful of adding too much additional horsepower with a pair of V8's, even small ones. A Plain Jane 4.3 (V6) is rated at 175, as for V8's 305's at 220, 5.7's around 250 horsepower. Of course those are minimum ratings.

    Don't forget propellers. You may need to adjust them or replace depending on how much horsepower you're trying to push through them.

    I believe you can reverse prop rotation in Velvet drive transmissions. I'd look into the torque implications of running both engines in the same direction regardless of prop rotation. I'm not saying that two left handed engines won't work I'm just not sure.

    Good luck.

    MIA
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
  5. markp
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    markp Junior Member

    Thanks for your reply
    Figured that 283s would be most economical and also the small size. Also not looking for excessive HP or torque.

    I want to maintain open cooling to make it more sale able , just in case.

    All wiring will be new marine/auto wiring

    pics to come soon!
     
  6. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  7. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Diesels would increase sale probability AND SALE PRICE.
    Many potential buyers are in terror of gas engines afloat and won't consider it.
     
  8. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Interesting that people would be terrorized of gas engines? BUT, almost all boats using outboards use gas dont they, and they have builtin large fuel tanks in the bilges.
    And no one is afraid of outboard powered boats. Some people have put outboards on an inboard powered boat, and I think it is a good idea too. Gets the engine out of the bilge where it creates a lot of engine room heat, and makes it much easier to work on props and things. So possibly more space inside the boat for other things.
     
  9. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Velvet drives can turn either way by rotating the internal oil pump. That trans, the prop must always turn the same direction as the engine due to oiling issues in that trans design.

    Yes, you can have both prop turning the same direction, but it creates prop walk. But think about it, all these multi outboard powered boats, all 4 or 5 props all turn the same direction dont they.
     
  10. markp
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    markp Junior Member

    thanks sdowney- you bring up a great point about props turning same direction. perhaps the counter rotation engine was meant to reduce stress to the hull? Being an older wood hull, the last thing I want to do is to create undue stress and resulting water leaks.
     
  11. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    The Yamaha 150 hp four stroke engine is one of their most popular - I have seen quite a few here, including twin installations (typically on 25' Grady Whites) and they all have counter rotating engines. This is mentioned in the link below -
    Yamaha Four Stroke 150HP Outboard Engine - Reef Marine https://reefmarine.net/product/yamaha-four-stroke-150hp-outboard-engine
    I think that the larger engines (and maybe some smaller?) are also available with LH propellers.
    Re a triple installation, I guess they would be 2 x RH typically, and 1 x LH?
    And with 4 motors on the back, 2 x LH and 2 x RH?
     
  12. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    As you say, outboards are not below decks. Gas fumes can still find their way below even from cockpits, but having gas inboards below hatches, the gasoline is already where you don't want it. Can be dangerous explosive and fire hazzard, if you don't ventilate really really well, before cranking.

    Probably wouldn't repower with diesel just to eliminate gas inboards, but if you already intend to repower, why NOT consider diesels? Much safer, higher resale value, better economy. Longer lasting.
     
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  13. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Here is an example for 3, how about 5 engines.
    What Are The Usual Prop Rotation On Triple? - Offshoreonly.com https://www.offshoreonly.com/forums/general-boating-discussion/182080-what-usual-prop-rotation-triple.html
     
  14. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Cost versus benefit equation. Even new diesels, wont give you back more than was paid for them and will still be much less, it is a loss with either kind of engine.
    And being a wood boat even if in great looking condition, few would want to take it on.
    With new diesels, it is about like this, the buyer would be buying only the motors and the rest of the boat is free.
     

  15. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Why new diesels?
    Marine Diesels are rebuildable nearly forever.
    AND LAST NEARLY AS LONG.
    My boats were built in 69 and 71, Only have one diesel, 2 cyl 10 hp, built in 74, runs great. Paid $300 for it.
    Hope I find another good one similar price!
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
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