55' Commercial Fishing Vessel Design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by JDN, Dec 28, 2010.

  1. JDN
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    JDN NicholsBoatDesign

    I have several designs waiting to find their builder.
     

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  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    What rule do they comply with?
     
  3. JDN
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    JDN NicholsBoatDesign

    Rule? Not sure what you are getting at.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There are rules that fishing boats have to comply to in different areas and countries. Do your designs comply with any of them?
     
  5. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  6. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Jeez. ABS Reinforced Plastic Vessels, for shitsakes, and US CFR if somebody wants to pay for it. You want to build it to a rule, bring cash and have at it.
    Nice looking' boats, Sir. Let's see more!
     
  7. JDN
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    JDN NicholsBoatDesign

    Of course they would comply with any and all requirements. I am a former USCG Licensed Master with 35 years experience.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Of course? You are not telling me which rules do they comply with.
     
  9. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Gonzo, they do not comply with any classification rules, per se, unless the inspector from Loyds or German Loyds or DNV or BV or WHOEVER you want to pay, comes and inspects the process.
    To get insurance (that is the reason for classification, right?) the vessel will have to satisfy criteria of accustomed practices or, if you will, ABS, more or less. If one has the classification society's inspector along for the ride, including ABS, there is a cost. The guy is in North Carolina designing boats. Do you think he's going with a Japanese or Iranian standard? No, The boats will be sold then inspected by an underwriter's representative (a surveyor that has somewhat proven himself), the surveyor will have a peeve about wanting safety wire on rudder bolts or a sign that says "head pump-out valve normally closed", or whatever, then the new owner goes fishing. I don't believe there exists a A1 or E3 rating like Loyd's used to have anymore anyway. You pass, or there are deficiencies, then you correct them. Then they might further class for special circumstances or equipment. The reputable societies are likely all very similar by agreement anymore, otherwise there would still be excess "class-hopping". Why do you always try to make things difficult? Are you just trying to sound like you know what you are talking about?

    Nice lookin' boats, Sir. Can we yet see inside, machinery layout, holds, etc.?
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The reason to comply is to be able to register a vessel or using for whatever you are planning to. The design has to comply with the designated use. Classing societies are not very similar, reputable has nothing to do with it. The surveyor will make sure the boat complies, but unless you designed it to, the modification will be prohibited. Have you read any of the classification societies' rules, CFR, NFPA, etc? For example, for the USCG to inspect under Chapter T, the builder has to provide plans showing it complies before the build starts.
     
  11. JDN
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    JDN NicholsBoatDesign

    Thanks Mark. The fishing boats would comply with the current USCG regs in place for Commercial Fishing Vessels, but since they are under 100 GR. Tons and not T boats, the regs are a bit different. As long as the designs are presented to a builder by a certified Naval Architect or proven designer, there is usually no further undertaking by any agency, etc. Of course the person who buys the boat would most likely have it gone over by an underwriter and surveyor and then all the necessary criteria for insuring it would be met. I have had extensive experience with ABS and surveyors on the large OSVs I used to run, and there is a totally different set of criteria for Uninspected Fishing Vessels.
     

  12. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    How exaspirating.
    Sir, Are the rudders drawn to scale? If you'll go there, I recently installed a Tides Marine rudder tube http://www.tidesmarine.com/rudder-port-bearing-d.shtml, a different model but this is the type you would use (they are glass boats?) and couldn't be happier! I also, at the same time, went to a smaller rudder, more hydrodynamic, and faired my keel to a knife edge in the back for improved flow, and got rid of the rudder shoe. My fuel economy has improved greatly but I find I am always nervous when maneuvering around lines. I intend to put a small line guard but the internally supported rudder is fantastic!
    If the side lights are mounted where they are are in the drawing, I feel that they will glare into the pilot house.
    I like the modern look of the reverse transom. I like that the shear doesn't break hard and that most of the curve is in the back third of the boat. I think the little cabin swoop looks good but will make the cockpit less functional on the pleasure model.
    I am not a fan of the forward raked windows on the commercial models but understand why you do them. Please specify thick, strong glass up there as these windows might one day catch green water scooped up by the bow. (I had a recent scare and my boat did fine but boats with forward raked windows lost glass).
    Though the hull looks full, I detect a bit of chine, also from the angle of the back of the keel, I surmise that there is a bit of shaft down-angle. What is the hull form?
    Your single engine boat shows foresight! Others may stay tied to the dock with five or seven dollar fuel. Oh, while on the topic of efficiency, please look up Apex1's thread on CPP. I know you've used them on OSVs but consider it for these and I think the outcome will be positive.
    There's a pot of unsolicited advice meant to be constructive! Good luck and show us how a build comes. - Mark
     
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