5 year old container ship breaks in half

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Corley, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  2. tomas
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    tomas Senior Member

    uh-oh...

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    wooaaahhh!!!

    Either poor loading procedure of the containers and/or poor localised fabrication/detailing, or repair, that lead to a fatigue crack which went, zzzzzzzzzzzzzzip!
     
  4. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Hey, now you have two container ships, maybe this is due to different destinations of the containers :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  5. dinoa
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    dinoa Senior Member

    Salvage should be very interesting.

    Dino
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Some credit to the NA that designed the ship is due. Most boats would have capsized and sunk after a failure like that.

    They certainly got the watertight compartment design spot on.
     
  7. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    thanks for the chuckle RW,
    I certainly do see your point, it is truly amazing.
    however it did break in half. :D
     
  8. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Now that the bow fell off, all they have to do is tow it out of the environment.
     
  9. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    My understanding of these ships is that they are constructed in segments if the ship was recovered would it be possible or worth repairing? I recall reading about one ship where engine wear had rendered it unable to meet average speed requirements to be economically viable. They shortened the ship and managed through the reduction in weight to make it meet the required parameters to reenter transport duties.
     
  10. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  11. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Well yes, the definitely are built that way - but the suckers are supposed to be welded.

    I would love to see the 'raw ends' to see if someone forgot to inspect the welds at station 48, and see if it was only bolts holding the middle together.
     
  12. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Photos show she split at the aft end of cargo hold 3 or 4(?) which would be about the loacation of maximum moment when hogging. I wouldn't be suprized if there wasn't some damage to the longitudinals/keel (container hit or grounding) because the photo in post #2 shows a compression failure of tanktop. Also looks like she lost a the whole stow out the end of the breach also.

    Anyway, to answer Corley's question, it all depends on where the damage was. If it was in the PMB, then you could just cut out the damaged cargo hold, but most likely she is a CTL unless they totally rebuild the bow because she would be to small to make a profit (which is measured in pennies per container). Rebuilding would depend on the cost split between new construction/prime move economic life compared to the insurance payout.

    Edit, she is IMO 9358761, ex APL Russia built by MHI Nagasaki
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2013
  13. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    LOL:rolleyes:
     
  14. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member


  15. BPL
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    BPL Senior Member

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