5 meter deep-v custom cold mold build

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by peterjoki, Jul 27, 2014.

  1. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What is the intended usage of the boat ?
     
  2. peterjoki
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Turku, Finland

    peterjoki Junior Member

    It will be purely recreational. Within my possession it will be used to make day trips exploring in the archipelago sea. Since it is trailerable other destinations in Europe are not impossible.

    So far I have had the occasional brush with rocks. Mostly at crawling speed whilst carefully looking for a place to land on an island, or finding a nice place to anchor. No severe damage so far. Worst was a slightly bent axle support on a full-displacement steel cruiser. Draft was around 70cm.

    These waters are quite dangerous when leaving the marked channels due to the rocky geography. No sharp coral or volcanic rock... smoothly worn granite. Luckily there are next to none floating debris.
     
  3. peterjoki
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    peterjoki Junior Member

    Rocks

    The water over here has next to no visibility. Without the tell tale signs if the sea is calm, navigation relies on marked rocks on charts and a depth sounder.
    Luck goes a long way. A look out on bow is pretty useless.
     
  4. peterjoki
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    peterjoki Junior Member

    Hey SukiSolo,

    A boiling test will offer no useful info due to the characteristics of epoxy, good one though... made me smile!

    I am now planning to purchase my epoxy required for gluing and laminating. SP 320 will be used for final glassing and clear coating (a UV resistant varnish will be used as a final finish, your suggestions are much appreciated). I am really leaning towards SP 106 for the construction of the hull due to the fact that is nearly half the price of 320. What problems have you experienced? This is the only thing delaying me in making my final purchase decision.
     
  5. SukiSolo
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    SukiSolo Senior Member

    Never had a problem with the 320 for bonding or flow coating. The 106 may be cheap but personally I have had it not cure fully on one batch even though well mixed and correct ratios. Sent sample to SP (now Gurit) who claimed insufficient hardener, but the ratio was definitely correct and very high ambient temperature ie 28-30 deg C so should have cured.

    Talking to other builders and foil makers, they have all confirmed that the 320 is a far superior resin. The data sheets confirm this too. Again one or two have had 'problems' with the 106. Don't compromise the adhesive in your build. In fact the key is keeping the glue line thin for cold moulding to not have extra weight. With vacuum, my choice would be either resourcinol or urea formaldehyde (for life/cost) but with epoxy sheathing as you intend.

    Try some samples on baby bits of veneer to get a spreader that gives the right quantity. Resourcinol and urea formaldehyde are fine if you coat one face, whereas epoxy prefers both faces so uber thin coatings are required.
    Worth a test sample or two. Perhaps for bits that could make up parts of the interior later? especially if sucessful. It is the bleed through, that is the problem with thin veneers. Less of a problem with sheathing, but if you want a varnish finish...;)
     
  6. peterjoki
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Turku, Finland

    peterjoki Junior Member

    Build update

    Hi all,

    It's been a while since I've last logged on, let alone update this thread.

    The construction is well underway.

    A LOT of time was spent lofting and sawing the frames to size. I still have a lot of fairing to do. Not because of the plans, but because making frames by hand for the first time isn't all that easy. 2 out of 14 glued up wrong (which I dont find too bad).

    Frames and stringers are of khaya. Engine bed is of Ash/Khaya laminate. Plywood is Okume.

    I have gone for Europox 232 as my epoxy for this build. Priced at 14€ a kilo (boatbuilder's price) it is the cheapest. So far no negative remarks. Curing is quite slow, but that is only an advantage in my circumstances. About an hour.
    Clarity is as good as SP 320, tried and tested!

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    This design was graciously drawn up for me by TANSL. The more this design progresses the more I am infatuated by it. The lines are fabulous and the hydrodynamic nuances at COG cannot be a mistake.

    To reinforce the build I will be glassing the hull with epoxy and a laminate schedule of 300 + 300 roving + 175 twill.


    This project will be powered with a Mercruiser 350 MAG + Bravo III sterndrive for a calculated speed of around 48kn.

    All comments, positive and negative are much appreciated. Provided that and constructive theme is abided by.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Builderjeff
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Builderjeff Junior Member

    very nice!

    Jeff Warner,
    E-Boat Inc. boatbuildercentral.com
     
  8. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I'm glad you're so pleased. The "skeleton" looks good. Well done!
    Keep us informed of your progress.
    Cheers.
    Ignacio
     
  9. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Beautiful design. This boat will turn heads when you get it on the water .
     
  10. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Nice, Very Good Looking Job.................................
     
  11. SukiSolo
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    SukiSolo Senior Member

    Nice looking boat, good work. It might be worth using some fine roving or tape on the edge of the spray chine, I think you may have some trouble getting 300 gsm roving to go round the sharp edge. 200 gsm or lighter would probably sit on it OK, the twill will too. Maybe feather it in after the main coating is on to keep a sharp edge?, taking it to the end of the 'flat' inside, round the edge then feathered into the 'vertical' sides?

    Good luck with her. Sweet stem laminate, looks nice and tight with suitable sizing, it will certainly take the winching loads....;) Looking forward to the odd further build update.
     
  12. JakubT
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    JakubT Junior Member

    Any news? We need more pictures:)
     
  13. Wayne Grabow
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    Yes, you definitely need to keep us up-to-date on this build. How cool will that be when you take this beautiful, custom, fast hull out for a run! And to think that you helped in the design and built it yourself! That is as good as it gets.
     
  14. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member


  15. peterjoki
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Turku, Finland

    peterjoki Junior Member

    long due update

    Thank you all for the encouraging words!

    I apologize for being so inactive on the forum. It's been a busy spring...
    High time for an update!

    After some trials I found that my 12mm okume would conform to the form of the bow. No need for cold-molding yet (sides will be a different story).

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    It took a whole lot of force but to my surprise it worked out well.

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    Both sides fitted and shaped. They were glued up one after the other to avoid the frames from being distorted.

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    All done, except for keel plate.

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    Glassed up with 2x 300gr roving. 4 layers over keel and extra strips added to bow for a total of 5 layers.

    Fairing was done using epoxy mixed with fillite microspheres and a little bit of collodial silica. After sanding the filler layer was glassed in using a 175gr cloth, and given a fill coat later that day.

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    The strakes are made of pine. I may need to change them soon however.
    TANSL called for 100mm wide, however I ended up experimenting with 50mm.
    I hope that this won't impact the stability and saftey?

    As for the paint system below the waterline I used International Interprotect primer. The top coat is 3 layers of international perfection. Perfection isn't recommended for use below waterline and is a gamble/experiment on my part.
    I'll wax the bottom thoroughly to fill in the pores. I don't think there will be an issue as the boat will be on a trailer. I'll let you guys know how the paint holds up, but it will be a while before I have any news for you ;)

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    Many have said that it looks strange to see the bottom finished without the sides in place. My plan is to flip the boat next, then do the sides. It will be easier to fair everything up as the sides and deck become one towards the stern.

    I'm off to Greece tonight and will be gone for a week. Will do my best to respond whenever I get wifi.

    Hope you all have a great summer!
     
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