46' Sailboat Hull Rebuild Mat removal

Discussion in 'Stability' started by cwhofman, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. cwhofman
    Joined: Jan 2016
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    Location: Denver CO

    cwhofman New Member

    Hello everyone,

    I have a Durbeck D-46 with severe blistering below the waterline. It looks to be throughout the out Mat layer. I'm in the process of removing the saturated Mat.

    My question is, does the mat layer have any structural component?
    If I remove the Mat can I seal and fair, or do i need to rebuild up the layer?

    I have searched and search and have not been able to find a similar question

    thanks
    Chris Hofman
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    That depends on the laminate. I sandblast the blisters because it is the fastest and easiest way to do it. How did you determine the depth of the blistering? Ideally, you would cut a couple of coupons to examine the laminate's damage.
     
  3. cwhofman
    Joined: Jan 2016
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    Location: Denver CO

    cwhofman New Member

    Hi Gonzo,

    First thanks for the Reply !!

    I have started the removal of the gelcote and located all or most of the Acidic Fluid looks to be between the Mat Layer and woven. I was actually able to pill the Mat Layer off in chunks.

    I have a peeler that I'm going to utilize, as the Mat looks to be a total loss..

    My concern with this is if there is a need to rebuild the Layer?

    Chris
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Many manufacturers use a layer of mat for bulking and to prevent print-through. It is slightly structural but not critical. If you take the whole layer off, it is easier to laminate a layer of mat with vinylester. It has better adhesion and moisture resistance than polyester. Be careful not to cut into the roving, which is structural. Good luck with your project. Grinding fiberglass is really unpleasant. I got a sample of a cream that stops the itching. I'll post the name of it when I get home. It really works.
     
  5. cwhofman
    Joined: Jan 2016
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    Location: Denver CO

    cwhofman New Member

    Gonzo,

    Thanks for the input and definitely post the name of the Cream

    Chris
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's a few ways to avoid the "itches", one is to use baby powder on all exposed skin, especially the joints. Hairspray is another method that's a little more durable. There's also the liquid Glove" products that also work well. I use a mail order product called PrimeShield Wet. Additionally, working "wet" helps cut down and control dust. Sand and grind with wet/dry papers and blades.
     

  7. cwhofman
    Joined: Jan 2016
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    Location: Denver CO

    cwhofman New Member

    Par,

    Thanks for the tips here I appreciate !!

    Chris
     
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