454 "Crate" HO to Marine

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by Eric G, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    This argument doesn't look to be shaping up well. Please, try to keep the discussions reasonably nice and helpful :)
     
  2. Jango
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    Jango Senior Enthusiast

    Stonebreaker, Thanks for the "Straight Facts"

    Jango
     
  3. Raylar
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    Raylar New Member

    Thought as a newbie here I would respond to Stonebreaker by saying yes their are lots of marine engine upgrades for the 496 8.1L engine. You might want to visit our website at www.raylarengine.com. I hope my technical knowledge cn be of benefit to other marine engine users here on the forum.

    Regards,
    Ray @ Raylar:)
     
  4. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Can always use more engine builders, Ray. Welcome, and glad to have you aboard boatdesign.net!
     
  5. fasteddy
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    fasteddy Junior Member

    This is fun. Mods, I'm kind of a newbie here, but jaysus, let these guys go a little. We can stand it. Ever been to Pirate4x4?

    I've also been bothered by a lot of what I see here. I'm NOT a racer (drove my last formal race in 1970), but I drive cars as fast as I can make, AND have them last 100k+ miles. I've "engineered" conversions from Japanese 6's to SBC's. I've transplanted turbo motors from Mitsu Starions to Mitsu pickups and suv's. I've built motors for road racers. I've picked the brains of the best I could find, and learned to recognize grain from chaff.

    Gonzo, I respect that you have tons of experience and lots of knowledge. Ditto, Stonebreaker. Is it possible that both of you "know" stuff that's wrong? Never saw it turn out that way before? Happens to me all the time. It's called "learning".

    I don't even think you guys are talking about the same number when you say "horsepower". I know lots of different kinds of hp. BHP, sae, din, etc., ad nauseum.

    I'm particularly amused at "libel". There are several elements necessary to prove libel. I haven't seen a single one, yet. Insults, perhaps, but insults only sting if there's an element of truth in them. That's one of my warning signs that I'm not dead on perfect right then.....

    Gonzo, glad your customers are happy. Stony, win a bunch of races.

    Certainty is an ephemera of small minds.....
     
  6. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The LT1 engine in my impala went through thousands of hours of testing on the dyno when GM developed it, including a 100 hour full throttle, full load test. That's 4 days at full throttle and maximum load without a rest. And that engine isn't even a race engine - it's in every 92-96 corvette, LT1 camaro, and impala ss on the road.

    Its even in my brides 1996 Buick Roadmaster station wagon.

    Just wonder why , with a torque cam installed ,its not seen marinized by the converters?

    FAST FRED
     
  7. fasteddy
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    fasteddy Junior Member

    Probably because they can buy the old style blocks cheaper and the accesories are already plentiful.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    What is the full load rating for the LT1? One other thing to consider is the type of work expected of the engine. For example, an engine in a bulldozer or a high speed boat that will see air needs softer bearings to be able to take the shock loads. By comparison, a higer revving engine with less load will use harder bearings. Most marinized engines use a composite type bearing of aluminum backing and copper/lead alloy surface. It is a fairly good compromise.
     

  9. stonebreaker
    Joined: May 2006
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    stonebreaker Senior Member

    I'm guessing it was too expensive. For crying out loud, Mercury still uses SBC blocks 10 years after GM quit putting them into anything automotive, those cheap bastiches...

    Hey Fred, do you by any chance belong to the Impala forum?
     
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