30m Barge Construction method

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by black boat, Aug 29, 2019.

  1. black boat
    Joined: Aug 2019
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    black boat Junior Member

    HI ALL
    I want to design an assembly plan for fabrication of a steel barge (28 M length).
    owner say that we need to reduce overhead weld an totally weld line. I ask you o help me for the best fabrication method . Crane is ready to use and we have no problem for roll up section.
    Thank for your attention
     

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  2. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member

    Thanks. I am definitely happy to find you and I ll contact you. but now I haven't time. I ask your opinion for minimize over head welding.
     
  3. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Simple.
    Just modularise it and split into 2 sections - both open - so you can perform all welds down hand, or at least most of them.
    But you need the crane-age capacity to be able to lift and turn over each section to lay on top of the other.
    Which requires tight dimensional control during the welding.
     
  4. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member

    To transport sections, we had been limited, breath of section is 4 meters, so I ll split to 3 section, I was worried, I found many barge that constructed in straight method and stiffeners of main deck hold on frames then plates cover stiffeners.. all weld line between stiffeners -plates and web frames-plates will become overhead, but I didn't give up.
    thank you for your reply..
     
  5. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member

    Of course, we have a big mobile crane. but we ll construct this barge manually in all production line.
     
  6. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    As noted - depending upon the cranage capacity - build the bottom and sides - all down hand.
    Then build the top...down hand separately on a jig.
    Then offer the top onto the bottom and sides...and if clever, the joint can be down hand and one sided.
    Simple
    It's child's play!
    Done this sooooooooooooooo many times before.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you have a big crane, it may be possible to roll the sections and weld all horizontal. It is a method used in fiberglassing to make the job easier.
     
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  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Sounds like you already have everything sorted out in which case, I assume, one wouldn't be so worried to wish to discuss such a manoeuvre/sequence by contacting a member separately. Since this is an open forum for those that wish to learn - it seems such simple manoeuvres are also one of many typical day to day shipyard functions that other members do not know nor understand and attempt to subvert as difficult as they are inexperienced in such simple shipyard functions, yet wish to be seen to be knowledgeable for some reason.

    Just start the usual way all flat panels on the floor and mark them up:
    upload_2019-8-30_9-35-6.png

    Then add the flat panels to a jig for dimensional control and easy access for ER-ect_ING etc:
    upload_2019-8-30_9-36-53.png


    So then all flat panels, can be welded down hand, and then you can add the structure and out outfitting in sequence, like so:
    upload_2019-8-30_9-21-4.png

    ...easy all open access - child's play to a shipyard already versed in construction.

    Then since open, the welding of the webs and supporting stiffeners is again, all open and easy access:
    upload_2019-8-30_9-22-25.png

    See, simple. No need by others for fear mongering or hyperbole and misdirection owing to obfuscate the obvious lack of knowledge on such matters themselves. Those that have never done this before and do not understand construction will always fear what they do not know, yet attempt to make out as their position of fear - is the norm.

    Once the bottom and sides are done, depending upon which sequence suits your yard layout, you can lift and section you have made, and just like lifting a simple deckhouse, which is also just 3 open sides, like below - simple:
    upload_2019-8-30_9-27-7.png

    The internals as always are braced for support. Attempting to do otherwise would suggest lack of experience in typical lifting of day to day events within a shipyard.

    The can then be lifted onto the the remaining flat section to weld down hand externally and internally, or:
    upload_2019-8-30_9-29-5.png

    ...weld the top plate down hand from the outside - but this still leaves the last connection, interior, overhead, when welded in-situ.

    So, there are endless ways to do this, all very simple and straight forward, not rocket science as others would lead you to believe. I've done these manoeuvres more times than i can shake a stick at. It all depends upon the number of welders you have your time schedule and the capacity of the craneage you have to do this, as well as height/space limitations.

    See - simple, it is child's play to any fabricator.

    PS...hahaha..this word capture is so overly PC...one cannot say a simple shipyard term as ******** but I must write as ER-ect-TIon
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
  9. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member



    Thank you very much, I will apply your idea and prepare my plan and share with you to review .If you have other construction pictures, please send here, they will be very useful for me .Thanks again..
     
  10. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    As Ad Hoc say it is as simple as that if you pay attention to tolerances and fabrication sequences. It you are smart at the bilge and sheer strake you won't have to make any overhead welds...vertical or horizontal at the worst.

    Edit: LoL had to change ******** to fabrication
     
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  11. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Lol - ditto
    Stupid PC spell checker not understanding shipyard engineering terms! o_O

    When is an ******** not an ******** - hahaha

    EDIT - hahahaha..even removes THE word from the Link....geeeessss :eek:
     
  12. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member

    Hi
    Dear Ad Hoc
    I attached a picture of my plan..Please review and comment..Thanks
     

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  13. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member

    Thanks ,I sent a picture above. please review.
     
  14. black boat
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    black boat Junior Member

    I think there isn't necessary to add margin to plates and stiffeners at boundary of blocks, you agree?
     

  15. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Looks like you're doing all the bottom surface down hand and then offering up the secondary structure sequentially - which seems fine.
    Then you do the same for the sides, you can do these also all down hand.

    In the "old days", it was normal to add 'green'. A small amount which would be cutoff when the 2 different assembly's are mated together.
    But today, if the yard are skilled and the assembly's are made on a jig with a high degree of dimensional control, then the 'green' becomes unnecessary and just adds work and bit removing the 'green' tabs.
    Thus it all depends upon the skills and facilities in your yard whether you prefer to add 'green' and cut off to butt the two assembly together in their exact positions, or not add any green.
    Coupled to this, whether you place you main assembly joints plays into this, since if you are clever you can make the joint become the 'green' and also a down hand-joint too.
    It is all about the sequencing of assembly.
     
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