30' plywood sharpie

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by davesg, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 331, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Yes, beautiful. I'm very sorry that I didn't go after it 1½ years ago. Asking price was € 12,000.--

    Regards,
    Angel
     
  2. boat fan
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 717
    Likes: 17, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 435
    Location: Australia

    boat fan Senior Member

    You didn`t " dare to ...":D

    Just kidding.....
     
  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 331, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    No, it has one ballasted centerboard. (‘‘hefkiel’’ in Dutch. I don't know if ‘‘centerboard’’ is a correct translation for what they used)

    P.S. I think ‘‘ballasted daggerboard’’ is the correct translation for ‘‘geballaste hefkiel’’. (Dutch ‘‘steekzwaard’’ is in English ‘‘daggerboard’’)

    Yes.

    No, the draft is: 0,30 / 1,50 m = 1' / 4' 11"

    A remarkable detail is the daggerboard style rudder in a well.

    [​IMG]

    Regards,
    Angel
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 27, 2009
  4. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 14, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 185
    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    I was wondering if that was a drop down rudder . Good way to get some depth to the rudder . I had thought of that myself , but wondered how to deal with the opening in the bottom . I suppose There could be a round plate that the whole rudder assembly could rotate in .

    Do you know if the board is off center ? Perhaps build into the seat .
     
  5. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 1,743
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2078
    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    Thank you for all the links, Angel. The pictures are a crash course in how to lay out and build the cabin and amenities of a sharpie.:)
     
  6. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 331, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    That could be a solution to get rid of the hole in the bottom that disturbs the water flow. It doesn't have to be watertight if the whole constuction is in a well. But it should have very little friction to maintain the feeling in the rudder. It is complex and expensive, that isn't sharpie like. I don't know if they closed the rudder hole in the bottom of the Sharp-End 900.

    I didn't see the boat. But there is nothing about the board being off-center in the previous posted link and the attached file. I think that if the board was off-center that they would have mentioned it, so I presume it is not off-center.

    About the board, I edited this into post #93:
    The attached file speaks of ‘‘geballaste hefkiel’’ and here is stated ‘‘modern profiel steekzwaard’’ these two together translated is ‘‘ballasted modern profiled daggerboard’’.

    Regards,
    Angel
     
  7. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 1,743
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2078
    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    Here's a detailed article on building such a rudder in a well, complete with good photographs.

    http://www.epoxyworks.com/18/pdf/rudder.pdf

    Basically, there is no hole. The rudder sets in a tub, which fills and seals the well.

    I'm impressed, but no way am I getting that fancy on my own boat.
     
  8. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 14, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 185
    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    Thanks Angel , regardless of my opinions about the cast and complexity , the boat is beautifully done . If you are building for resale, it really has to be . A painted ply interior with some wood trim would be fine for me .

    If the ballast is in a lifting board then the 650lb. ballast be plenty . Thats a
    pretty sharp sharpie
     
  9. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 331, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    this one is OT...

    BTW Frank and others, if you like shallow draft and off-centerboards, I have put up a quest for them in the playground of this forum. The regular's won't take the bite so perhaps I can drag you guy's into playing with me :)

    Please don't react here on this OT message. This is a serious topic :idea: Reactions are invited in the playground :D :D

    Regards,
    Angel
     
  10. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 14, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 185
    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    For those that have not seen this
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 331, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thats me... Thanks !!!

    Regards,
    Angel
     
  12. johnelliott24
    Joined: Dec 2006
    Posts: 32
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: SoCal

    johnelliott24 Junior Member

    Light shappie

    I really like sharpies but every sharpie I find is heavy. My background is in building very fast beach multis. I have a Tornado that I use as a baseline and have fun building faster/better and slower/worse multis than her. My next project is probably to build a sharpie like center hull for fast cruising that can sail alone as a sharpie but slide into my cat and become a trimaran. As a tri she will be a lot slower than the foiling cat she is in, but still a lot faster than the Farrier tris or other cruising tris. When I want to go for a wild ride she will slide out and moor until I come back and pick her up again. (Thinking about naming her Thunderball after the yacht in the movie that converted into a hydrofoil.) She will also be able to sail with a small two masted rig for classic day sailing. The design is to be like the one proposed in this thread but the hull will weigh about 200 lbs. The difference from this design is that the main hull will be narrow but the stern will be wide so that the hull planes -- so sharpie lines but like a skiff underwater. With 2 short masts, flared sides and a weighted daggerboard she will be tender, but self-righting. As a sharpie this boat should be really easy to trailer and move around. The sharpie designs I see are heavy. Why not make them light? The 30 footer is this thread could easily wight 400 lbs, correct? Would it not be a heck of a lot of fun to sail and trailer at that weight? Has anyone seen this done?
    John
     
  13. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,614
    Likes: 1,102, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The 30 footer would be more like 2000 pounds. I don't know what kind of materials you are using in your calculations to come up with 200 pounds.
     
  14. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 1,743
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2078
    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    Sharpies aren't really very heavy boats. Stop and think about it: the classic sharpie was 35' LOA, and maybe 6' wide on the bottom. The draft was about a foot amidships or thereabouts....but the stem was a couple of inches above the waterline, and the bottom swept up out of the water well before the transom. How much weight did it take to get down to its lines?

    Not much. Even though they were heavily built, they only weighed a couple of thousand pounds. How many other sailboats over 30 feet long can you think of that weigh that little?

    To build a modern sharpie along the same dimensions that only weighed 400 pounds would be pointless, unless you were going to push it with an outboard instead of a sail. Even the tiniest of sail plans would lay it on its ear, in anything beyond a zephyr.

    By the way: traditional sharpies did plane, even without a wide stern. They did so rather easily, as a matter of fact. But it was because of their relatively light weight combined with a straight forward hull, not because of wide sterns.

    Will a sharpie compete with a multi-hull for speed? Of course not. If you want multi-hull performance, go build a multi-hull. And if you want a sharpie, go build a sharpie. They're different animals.

    I'm reminded of the time my uncle caught my mother adding sugar to her cornbread. That was over fifty years ago, but I can still hear him telling her, "******* it, Erlene! If you're going to make cake, make cake. And if you're going to make cornbread, for God's sake make cornbread."
     

  15. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 14, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 185
    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    A 35' New Haven racing sharpie could do 20 knots . With a lot of live ballast on hiking boards . Sorry I dont have a picture
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.