30' plywood sharpie

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by davesg, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Well, we grow too soon old, and late smart. I just did a google search for used books, and found out the original edition of Chapelle's American Small Sailing Craft was published as a quarto back in 1951. In other words, it was about 9"x12", instead of the octavio (6"x9") size I just bought. And the sad part is that there are used ones in good shape on the internet, for about what I paid for the dinky new edition. So I guess I'm going to pay twice, because I'd really like to have the full-sized book.

    More interestingly, I found out Chapelle also had a book published back in 1936, that was titled just American Sailing Craft, instead of American Small Sailing Craft. It was also quarto sized. And although I haven't managed to run down any detailed descriptions, I gather it was also oriented toward smaller craft rather than ships, and was full of drawings. There are copies of it available also, for a reasonable price. So it's a good thing payday is tomorrow, because that makes two books I need to order.....gotta love the internet. It's a brand-new way to keep me broke.

    And another factoid: while I was at it I looked up John Gardner's Dory Book, because the copy I have is falling apart. I was shocked to find out it's no longer in print, and the going prices for a used hard cover ranged well over a hundred bucks. Even the paperback versions were about $75.00, for crying out loud. Guess I'll just keep sticking the pages of mine back inside the cover as they fall out....Woodenboat is coming out with a new edition in December, but I'll bet it's going to be a little book instead of the original full-sized one.
     
  2. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I'm not claiming this is the recommended procedure for building models; I've never taken any classes or gotten any advice. But I've started on the model for my sharpie, and this is how I do it.

    I usually start with a 1x3 or 1x4 board for a strongback, with a centerline and stations penciled in. If I'm making a model from existing plans, I tack a cleat at each station. I set a baseline above the hull instead of below it to get the height of my molds, and attach them with pushpins.

    On this one I'm doing it bass-awkwards. I started with a couple of sides the shape I wanted (a straight taper), and left a little extra on each end to tweak the stem plumb and the transom to a nice angle. Then I used packing tape to fasten the stems, wrapped them around a temporary center mold, and taped them to the transom. I'll add some spreaders as I go, to modify the beam and teak the shape of the bottom. You'll notice the spreaders aren't really doing anything useful; I just stuck a couple in to give the general idea. I'll replace them with spreaders at future bulkhead locations, when I get back to work on it.

    When I'm happy with the shape, I'll tape heck out of things. Then I'll add an inner stem, along with bulkheads fore and aft for watertight compartments, a bulkhead at each end of the cabin, and one between the cockpit and the bridge deck. For that, I normally use Crazy Glue and woodworker's glue (aliphetic resin), depending on what I'm gluing.

    When the bulkheads are in place, I'll notch them and slip in chines and sheer clamps, and a plank keelson, cover the bottom, take the model off the strongback, and go from there.

    The originals used planks on edge for the keelson, to stiffen the long, narrow hulls and keep them from hogging. But since I'm using plywood on the real one, I don't think I need to.

    [​IMG]

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  3. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

    Are those sides straight edges ?

    Always amazed how straight panels with flair give nice sheer lines.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Straight topside plank edges usually give you a hollow or flat spot along the sheer and often a powder horn look too.

    Free form boat building can be a great learning experience.
     
  5. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

    Bolger often got it right though .
     
  6. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Depends on what you're building, and whether you're paying attention. I think problems of the sort you listed are easier to avoid on long, narrow, slab-sided hulls with gentle curves. What I'm doing is almost like playing with oversized fairing battens; fair curves should give me a fair sheer. Or that's the theory, anyway....if they don't, I'll tweak as necessary.

    And I'm not building totally free-form; the general parameters of what I'm doing were laid out generations ago, by builders who cranked them out quickly and simply. I've read repeatedly that sharpies are easy to build but hard to design, but I think most of the problems come from trying to push the sharpie form beyond its limitations. People want more beam, more headroom, more freeboard, better tracking, more sail, less heeling, so on and so forth.

    It reminds me of what Bolger said about adding sails to rowing dories: if you start modifying a traditional dory design to improve its performance under sail, you eventually wind up with something that isn't a dory hull at all. Which probably means you shouldn't have started with one to begin with.
     
  7. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Yep. They were cut straight, top and bottom.
     
  8. kayaker50
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    kayaker50 Junior Member

    Troy2000, that there is great stuff. Please post more as it progresses. Thanks, Chip.
     
  9. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)


    1½ years ago there was a Mystic Sharpie for sale in the Netherlands that was pro built in the UK in 1985. It looks like it is the blue and white Mystic that is on Brewer's website. The sale page is still available though not for 100%. But the links on the left site of the page and thumbs to the many pictures are still functional.

    This Mystic Sharpie with 2" raised freeboard was built in the archipelago of Espoo near Helsinki in Finland.

    Rodger Martin has designed a 30' GRP Presto Sharpie that is being build by the Union River Boat Company.

    Regards,
    Angel
     
  10. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Dutch built sharpie

    White Water Sharpie, Sharp-End 900

    This 29½' Egret style sharpie is being built in the Netherlands by Rexwinkel Jachtbouw for an astonishing € 129,750.00. Far as I know one built till now.

    Initiator of the project + first customer and sales: Frans van der Horst
    Designer: Martin de Jager (Martin de Jager Yacht Design)
    Builder: Benno Rexwinkel (Rexwinkel Jachtbouw)

    If you don't read Dutch or Flemish then this could be useful.

    Regards,
    Angel

    P.S.
    It is the same price* as Reuel Parker's 45' San Juan Islands Sharpie. There is also a blog about Reuel's new boat.

    * I guess the price of the Dutch boat is inclusive of 19% Dutch VAT and I guess the price of USA boat is VAT exclusive. If so, then the prices are not the same but remarkably close together for such a big difference in size.
     
  11. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    That is completely absurd to me . A simple cheap boat all dressed up like a yacht . What a waste of money . I like the fact , that they opened up the cabin . I assume it has 2 off center boards, they have obviously reduced the flair, and increased the draft . Which is not a bad idea , but it looks more Dutch than American in concept . I know that Bolger did not dig the Egret to much , and moved in the opposite direction. This boat looks more like Brewers boat than Monroes. The ballast ratio looks low to me .
    But the price is what really gets me .That is nuts for that boat . But come to think of it ,I have seen norwalk island sharpies , all pimped out and over priced .
     
  12. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

    Yes , in a " losing the plot" kind of way.:D


    Troy ...I think you are approaching this the right way. Simple.
    Spending that little extra time and effort to get that sheer " just " right...
    Well worth it...you will be looking at it for a long time after ....
     
  13. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

    Nice pic ![​IMG]
     
  14. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    That is beautiful . The boat , the setting , the whole idea .

    How much would it cost to build if you kept to the basics ? I would build it the same way that Parker builds his sharpies . But I might try tandom boards . or off center boards . then possible a skeg mounted, balanced rudder .
    Very cool boat.
     

  15. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

    With built in " shade sails " no less !:D

    Is anyone from the " dare to ..." thread watching ?
     
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