3,000yr old boats found in England.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    1 person likes this.
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Thanks, very interesting
     
  3. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Wow, what a fascinating, and also mysterious, find.

    If those boats were put there for storage purposes, then the sum of the marina fees will be pretty staggering. :eek:
     
  4. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    I am glad they could be recovered intact. Amazing!
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    I will enjoy to see the engravings on the hull, probably required by the prehistoric coast guard. :)
     
  6. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    what seems 'different' (if i'm reading the LIMITED info 1/2 correctly) is the 'removable' transom on a dugout.

    I could see adding a transom board on dugout to stretch the form to better shape, but haven't seen it elsewhere where "top spreaders" are used on double end dugouts.

    I'm wondering if "different trees" might be the reason, and for some reason a double ender don't want to work good with English wood. Or maybe a "transom dugout" is just a better boat.


    Maybe they were "stashed" for military or tax evasion purposes.



    "If those boats were put there for storage purposes, then the sum of the marina fees will be pretty staggering. " That might not be far off. LMAO!
     

  7. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    There have been a number of discoveries of Bronze Age craft in Britain. I apologise in advance for the peculiar speaking voices and the ghastly teeth in this first report.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-humber-21700535

    20 years ago a boat was excavated in Dover, Kent.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dover_Bronze_Age_Boat

    A half size version was built, but not all went to plan. On 13th May 2012, the vessel, which is called Boat 1550 BC, immediately began to take on water when it was lowered into Dover Harbour.

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1989781916/take-the-dover-bronze-age-boat-to-sea

    More successful was the launch in Falmouth, Cornwall of another Bronze Age replica on 6th May 2013.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21681465

    Thank goodness we now have epoxy resins & marine ply. Moss, pork fat & yew withies do not, a low maintenance boat make!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/o3jMHkrlTPiQCNd3TYy8EA

    http://greenwood-carving.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/more-bronze-age-woodworing.html

    Befriend the Dragon.

    http://den.vikingkings.com/
     
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