2460 bayliner hull stretching

Discussion in 'Stability' started by aitkenkingfish, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think it is obvious you need a bigger boat, if you have a four-seater car and need to carry six, you don't cut the car in half and insert another section with two seats.
     
  2. aitkenkingfish
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    aitkenkingfish Junior Member

    Actually there are lots of custom vehicles stretched not to mention the thousands of limos driving around everyday. What do you really think ther born like that?
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I would think it particularly rare for a stock vehicle to be extended for non-business purposes, it just makes a lot more economic sense to buy a vehicle that is fit for the specific purpose, as is. Please yourself, but with boats the handling difference of a stretched hull would be less predictable than a stretched car, so you are gambling a bit there. As PAR said, it might be better to rearrange the internal space to better suit what you want, but once you start cutting the thing through the underwater sections, you have a major undertaking on your hands.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This issue is a bit different then the car stretching analogy suggests.
     
  5. aitkenkingfish
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    aitkenkingfish Junior Member

    heres some pics.

    ill be adding a 30 to 50 gallon livewell on the back deck or swim platform haven't decieded.
     

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  6. aitkenkingfish
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    aitkenkingfish Junior Member

    found a few of the fresh pics

    also included 2 pics of the new diesel
     

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  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It seems to me that your open cockpit space is too small to be fishing a whole bunch of people. As is, seems too limited for four people offshore. You might look at shortening the area under cover, getting rid of the sink at the same time, maybe reducing the height of the coaming in that area. Putting a 50 gallon livewell on the swim platform would unbalance the boat, especially if you intend to have it carrying water and live bait underway.
     
  8. aitkenkingfish
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    aitkenkingfish Junior Member

    your a sharp cookie that's all the reasons im lengthening the hull


     
  9. aitkenkingfish
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    aitkenkingfish Junior Member

    Par

    At the point the coaming flattens out is about three feet that's where im planning on stretching the hull. Two or three feet would give me enough of a stretch to fish 6
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    So you are going to cut up two functioning hulls to leave one that might work OK ? A colossal job imo. And the chances are, that if your hull is inclined to "bog" running down-sea ( I am not familiar with the particular boat) as it stands, it is going to get a whole lot worse in its stretched configuration.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    On another boating related forum, there was a thread about a boat owner who "stretched" a little 5 metre power cat out to 6 metres if I recall correctly. It was a major job, and the progress reports and pix were seemingly interminable. Then came the announcement it was going for its maiden voyage. For some reason, no more was heard ! Assuming it didn't break up, I can only conclude it disappointed. I'd really like to hear about successful "stretch" jobs that lived up to the expectations.
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    From what I can see, the problem isn't hull length, but interior volume allocation and accommodation. A full 2/3's of the boat's length is dedicated to a V berth and pilothouse. It would seem a better accommodations layout would be a much simpler arrangement, then adding even more boat to what appears to already be a well burdened craft. Lastly, a 500+ pound addition (well) at the aft end of the boat wouldn't be a wise location, even with the stretch.

    What is the make, model and year of this boat?
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Also, unless the section being grafted in is a "prism", and fairs in cleanly, it will be a dog's breakfast. I'd personally leave the stretching to people like Boeing. I'm sure they test them exhaustively in wind tunnels to make sure it performs, with this it is just a matter of hoping or praying for the best.
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Passenger jet fuselages are tubular sections for the most part and designed to be stretched on the drawing board, assuming the model is successful. Plenty of examples of this.

    Powerboats on the other hand aren't, so the only easy way to stretch one is find a common max midship section (likely a diagonal) and piece a similar section in. This isn't all that unusual on a ship, where the midship section is constant along a considerable length. This is quite difficult without a "lines" drawing and assuming the mold is an accurate representation of it. The next easiest would be to just continuing the stern sections out along their natural extended lines, which as I mentioned previously, will result in a pinched in stern, but this is the natural "lay" of the lines, so . . .

    How this will affect handling, well just a guess without number crunching, but likely not as good as hoped, unless a serious weight and flow studies are performed.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Not many "chop shops" for fibreglass boats I suspect, way too much like hard work. :rolleyes: Would be a lot easier with a metal boat, generally speaking.
     
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