22 - 24 trimaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by waynemarlow, Jul 22, 2008.

  1. sunnysailor
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    Location: turkey

    sunnysailor Junior Member

    Hello All, i am new on the forum,after building a tiki 21 i am keen to build a buccaneer 24
    Old Sailor,could u tell me what you think about possibility to use a tiki 21 rigg on a buc 24 ?
    it has 20 square meters,no spreaders so the amas has to hold it up.
    the wingsail is so nice,a mast from just 6,45 is easy to set up and with a low point of pressure
     
  2. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Since the B24 in stock form has no spreaders I would think that a wing mast with it's shrouds attached to the leading edge of the mast would be just fine.
    You would have to use a towball sitting in an Oak socket to take the download on the pivoting mast. A well proven system. :D
    Since the shrouds on the B24 go to the outside of the floats they will not restrict the rotation of the mast too much.
    I had a similar system on my Piver Nugget and it worked very well. :cool:
     
  3. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    sunysailor.
    I didn't answer your question, did I. ?
    You asked if the B24 would take the Tiki 21 rig.
    Since the B24 and the Tiki 21 have roughly the same sail area,
    I can't see why not. :D OS7.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2011
  4. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I found this quote by Ian Farrier. I think he just about nails it. :D

    "Multihulls are now one of the fastest growing segments of the sailboat market. They have circumnavigated the globe at record speeds, and are rapidly becoming the family cruising boat of choice as more is learned about their many other advantages. These include level sailing, unmatched stability, deck space, unsinkability, shallow draft, comfort, and just the sheer fun of sailing a fast and responsive cruising boat".
     
  5. Waterat
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Waterat Junior Member

    Tiki Rig

    Hi SunnySailor, The Tiki rig will be slightly underpowered. Thats no bad thing
    as it will give you time to settle to the boat. Trimarans are fast craft
    and you need to spend time learning all the little knacks and how to
    sail her properly.;)

    Hi Oldsailer, Re the Farrier quote, Well we knew that already, didn't we :D:p:D

    Fair winds to all, Johnny.
     
  6. sunnysailor
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    sunnysailor Junior Member

    upgrading buccaneer 24

    Hello all,

    is there someone who has thaught about a simple faulding system for the buc
    24 ?
    it could give a easier and shorter assembletime.

    Thanks Johnny,a few meters less is not a problem,i live in turkey were a termal wind is blowing for months with 20+ knots is blowing:)

    greetings to all,

    Marco
     
  7. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Go to the B24 Builders Forum, Page 45, post # 667, and read all about what Bruce is doing.
     
  8. Bigfork
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Montana, USA

    Bigfork Junior Member

    another option worth a look

    Check out the Mike Waters 22 and 17...neat-o. I don't think anyone is building the 22 yet, but there is at least one 17 in the water (the potential of the high performance rig looks sweet too!). He's got a pretty extensive web site.
     
  9. eakingfisher
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: Alaska

    eakingfisher Junior Member

    plans

    looking build bar 24 or 28 Can I purchase plans?
    Thanks eakingfisher
     
  10. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    folding

    Marco, (and any others), I have been sailing and enjoying my boat instead of working on it. Sailing is fun! Sanding and epoxying- not so much:( I have built one a-board, but got the fit a little tight so I am re-doing it. (more sanding) I will get back on the folding system later this fall. It isn't really anything special, the geometry is much like a Farrier or Scarab, the hardest part is picking the main hull attach points and keeping them light and strong. I will probably still use dyneema water stays as the buc is wider than the "folding" tris and loads the beams more. I had a great sail on monday- hot 12-15 knot winds, warm water, about 800 lbs of crew and a 100 lbs more of gear and beer and still saw 7kts upwind and 12-15kts reaching. The Buc is really fun. B
     
  11. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Glad you are enjoying your sailing Bruce. We enjoy sailing here all year round, although it's a bit cold and wet right at present.. However we know Spring is only about three weeks away now.
    I have just got out of hospital after a right shoulder operation which was successful, but entails several more weeks of rehab. Given my left arm is permanently knackered I am afraid my boat building and sailing days are over.
    However my interest in multihull sailboats is undiminished and "that 24 ft Tri" is still available.
    Reallly interested to see how your use of dyneema for the water stays works out.
    If it is successful it will be a great technical breakthrough for use in all small trimarans, not just yours. :D
     
  12. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    waterstays

    I have been "testing" a length of 7/16 "Amsteel" (and my splicing) between my truck and a hard spot. So far, the dyneema is winning, but I haven't "jerk" tested it yet. I want to find a way to limit the impact to about 12,000 lbs. Once it has been under load for a while, it doesn't seem to creep but I think it will need to be re-tensioned after it is unloaded such as folding and trailering. It is really light and easy to work with and will save about 20 lbs on each end of the boat if I can trust it. B
     
  13. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Taralga NSW

    aussiebushman Innovator

    Great minds (also my inferior model) think alike. Here is the full size pattern made for my Trinardo hybrid now about 80% completed. The folding system was modelled on the Scarab but adapted for the dual beams I'm using. The upper component of each beam is actually 100 X 50mm alluminium box section and the lower is a demountable (3 parts) A-Class cross beam. The struts are doubled - a top and bottom pair for each beam, all 40 X 6mm 316 S/S.

    Although it looks though the amas will foul the trailer, actually they will not because a sliding frame will lift the hull clear of the existing fixed frame. Note the asymmetrical amas.

    Cheers

    Alan
     

    Attached Files:

  14. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    different- but the same

    AB, Nice progress. The double beam is interesting, and looks strong. Please keep us updated, and thanks for the pics. B
     

  15. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

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