2 part poly paint - is it safe to breathe the fumes

Discussion in 'Materials' started by wet-foot, May 3, 2008.

  1. wet-foot
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    wet-foot Senior Member

    I want to paint ( roll and tip out ) a small boat with a good 2 part polyurethane, are the fumes dangerous? This will be done in an attached garage.
     
  2. bxbbuddy
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    bxbbuddy New Member

    Yes. Air supply is needed.
     
  3. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    most contain isocyonates, they will damage your lungs forever, any mask cant filter out isocyonates, including carbon filters
     
  4. the1much
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    the1much hippie dreams

    YES the fumes are as dangerous as having an open 5 gallon gas can in every room,,,and NO im not exaggerating,,,does anyone you care about come in ya house?,,are you 100% sure you or 1 of those people coming in (even months after) wont have a BAD reaction to the 100and so BAD chemical fumes given off? ,,does anyone coming over have respiratory problems?,,,would ya like going to bed to the smell of the paint for a while?(,,hehe,,i would ;) ) ,,,and ive messed with paints for years,,,and dont follow safety procedures,,*cough*,,but,,if *arrrrrrrrrrrrrrggggfff* I could get,*hhhhhhhhhaaackkk* a breathe,,*cough**hack**spit***drool**,, i'd tell ya ,,,,ccccccceaaaaaaaaaaaaargggggggggrrrrrrrrrffffffff* ,,not ta worry
    hehe ;)
     
  5. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Yes, Very.
     
  6. grady
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    grady Novice

  7. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    I'm likely to gat hammered for this, but I've rolled out two part polyurethane paints (Interlux Perfection) on a number of occasions and have had no issues with toxicity.

    My understanding is that the isocyanates in the system do not become airborne unless one is spraying the paint. You definately don't want to spray these two-part paints unless you have an outside air source and an airtight suit.

    My experience is that the thinners that you must use with these paints are very potent. I wear a tyvek suit, gloves and an OSHA approved mask with proper canisters for organic solvents. I shave before I paint so that I get a good seal between my face and the respirator. The cansiters do a good job of filtering out the solvents as I cannot smell them while painting.

    Good Luck,

    MIA
     
  8. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    "I've rolled out two part polyurethane paints (Interlux Perfection) on a number of occasions and have had no issues with toxicity."

    that were immediately noticable......did you have a blood test to back up this observation.....believe me any volatile solvent based paint is not good for your health. I too have used them for years, but expect to pay for it later (if not sooner). Be sensible and protect your lungs.

    There are old pilots and bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots.
     
  9. wet-foot
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    wet-foot Senior Member

    I Can Smell the Gloss

    Interlux Perfection seems to be the DIY-er's choice for a brush on 2 part poly.
    Surprisingly the manufacturer shows it being brushed on with no breathing protection at all! They do mention the dangers of spraying. Sanding seems to be a bigger concern? When tipping off the painter has his nose 2 inches from the wet surface ............. so I guess its safe to brush. here's one of a few videos applying Perfection on YouTube; Smell the Gloss of Perfection
     
  10. wet-foot
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    wet-foot Senior Member

    In the video he's using one of those round head brushes ......... are they really better than a good regular style brush? thx :confused:
     
  11. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I like Brent Swains idea of running some clear polypipe from a simple home respirator to the outside of the shed.
    Those complex filter systems get gummed up quickly when spraying, and cost a small fortune to replace.
     
  12. wet-foot
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    wet-foot Senior Member

    Does anyone know if it really makes a difference to tip off with a real high quality brush? It seems to me the roller is responsible for laying down a nice even coat and the brush simply removes the stipple effect.
     
  13. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Yes the type of roller cover is very important, but so it the quality of the tip off. If, for instance, you useda coarse pig bristle brush, it would rake the surface and leave indentations in the lovely even roller job, if the brush was a fine quaility, it will greatly reduce the amount of raking that the bristles leave. Also, an old brush is often better than a new one, because the hairs have been tapered through use, and abraded away to a finer tip.
     
  14. the1much
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    the1much hippie dreams

    L.L. is absolutely right,,,,(even though i dont snail paint hehe) every GOOD snailer says the brush is just as important,,,in fact maybe more,,,your roller puts the paint on,,your brush gives you your "finish",,,,so i've heard,,hehe ;)
     

  15. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    the1much,

    Hey mate, try it sometime, it works!
     
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