1983 Bayliner Explorer 2070 stringer replacement project

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by Bukwheat1987, Feb 8, 2020.

  1. Bukwheat1987
    Joined: Feb 2020
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    Location: PNW

    Bukwheat1987 New Member

    Alright, so I bought a boat, turns out the stringers are shot, the last owner tried to glass over top of what was there and didn't do a good job. I am currently beginning to take everything out in preparation for stringer removal which is why I am here. I of course have questions, how much should I support the hull and how before I cut out the stringers? Is it necessary if I do 1 side at a time in stages? After that what size glass is recommended for stringers and how many layers? Also what kind of wood is recommended if I want it to last a while? I feel like if plywood is encapsulated properly it should last correct? Is there any tips or tricks anyone has I'm all ears. Thanks a lot I will take photos of before, during and after.
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Welcome to the Forum Bukwheat.

    For reference (until you can post some 'before' photos) here is a link to a sistership that was for sale -
    1983 Bayliner Explorer 2070 Hardtop https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/threads/1983-bayliner-explorer-2070-hardtop.500035/

    What is the boat currently sitting on - is she in your yard, and on a trailer or just sitting on blocks?

    Re replacing the stringers, there are basically two 'schools of thought' here - you can either
    1) Use a former which just gives the shape (no strength) where the strength is obtained from the layers of fibreglass over the former, or
    2) You can use plywood or hardwood that is suitably bonded in, using either polyester or epoxy.

    Be aware that you might well have to completely gut the interior to do all this work.
    And grinding fibreglass is not the nicest of jobs. And you will have to do a LOT of grinding first.
    Doing the fibreglass work afterwards is usually much easier in comparison.
    Hence why people skimp on the grinding..... it sounds like this is maybe what your previous owner did.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What is telling you the stringers are "shot" ? Has it depressions where the supporting rollers are ?
     
  4. Bukwheat1987
    Joined: Feb 2020
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    Location: PNW

    Bukwheat1987 New Member

    @bajansailor currently sitting in the driveway on the trailer so I'm not sure if it will hold shape if I cut 1 out at a time. The bilge has what I believe enough room to do it, it's going to suck but prevents me from cutting the deck out. How many layers would be needed for a form only?
     
  5. Bukwheat1987
    Joined: Feb 2020
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    Location: PNW

    Bukwheat1987 New Member

    @Mr Efficiency I dug into on with a screwdriver, if it's not rotted all the way it will be soon, since I'm going to fix it I dont want to do it more than once
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Hasten slowly, removing the old stringers will result in hull distortion if it is not properly cradled. What is the situation as regards encapsulation of the existing timber ?
     
  7. Bukwheat1987
    Joined: Feb 2020
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    Location: PNW

    Bukwheat1987 New Member


    They are still encapsulated if that's what you want to call it, if I had to guess maybe 3 layers, I'm not sure if its delaminating anywhere along them yet, I will try to get some photos tomorrow to post
     

  8. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If there is a fair bit of glass on those old stringers, I'd be inclined not to remove anything. You could sand and clean the glass on the stringers, and apply some more, to compensate for any decay meaning the wood is not performing its task as when new. It is too much work otherwise, on an old boat that is worth what, not much ? And won't be worth much more for all your work. Leaving rot in there is not a mortal sin.
     
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