1960 Chris Craft sportsman restoration project

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by rhtmarine, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. rhtmarine
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    I'm positive that this boat will shine when I'm done. I have done my homework, and I like the soft 5200 bottom. I don't need anyones approval. It means little to me. I love boats and working on them. That is why I'm doing this in the first place. I'm very good with a router if that makes a difference to you guys. I understand the pros and cons and have no problem with that. This is the method I've chosen, win, lose or draw.
    Par, I appreciate your opinion and input.
    Bob
     
  2. Tahoerover
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    Tahoerover Junior Member

    Plus they ride like crap.
     
  3. rhtmarine
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    Toherover, Where in nor cal are you located?
    Bob
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    What makes them ride like crap if the sides are redone too?
     
  5. rhtmarine
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    You guys do know I'm doing a 5200 bottom, not a rigid epoxy bottom. 5200 bottom is said to be a softer ride. Its going to flex and give more than epoxy. Not too sure what you're speaking of... Read about the 5200 bottom somewhere other than this thread and maybe you will understand. Epoxy would cost hundreds more as well. every square inch needs to be coated with several coats. Thats all six sides of every plank, including the screw holes. I'm going to carry on with my plan.:D
     
  6. Tahoerover
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    Tahoerover Junior Member

    They ride just like a FG boat.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's extremely unlikely anyone would notice the ride difference without extensive prior experience with the type. They will notice a crisper hole shot with an epoxy bottom, but the 5200 and traditional bottom jobs will have no real discernible ride difference. 5200 doesn't soften the ride at all and dries relatively hard, compared to most sealants. All 5200 does is act as a bedding, it's not like you're adding cushion foam in between the planks! Apply a 1/4" tall bead to a board, give it 3 to 4 weeks to fully cure and then try to wiggle it. You'll find it's quite stiff, especially if you apply a comparative bead of say BoatLife. If you really want to see it's physical properties, stand a short piece of thin plywood up and make a fillet around it's base. After a good cure, the BoatLife will be very flexible, but the 5200 will not be nearly so.

    I agree they ride like crap, but this is a function of the hull form employed which is a pre "63 series" shape and one quite common in the late 50's and early 60's. It's essentially a flat bottom boat with a fairly bluff entry and a classic double wedge hull form of it's era. On the plus side, they don't need much power to get up on plane and in flat water can really scoot along, which is the whole point of the design. Later generations of this hull form have finer entries, to handle chop better and the transition from the entry to planning surface is delayed (moved further aft a bit) to decrease wetted surface. These changes are often coupled with a taller chine profile to adjust the trim angle for the plane patch and carry the bow at a reasonable height.
     
  8. Tahoerover
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    Tahoerover Junior Member

    I'm in Stockton or Agate Bay.
     
  9. rhtmarine
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    Are you a river rat? My girlfriend and I love the delta. We both spent many weekends up there, just in different areas. I spent most summers in the upper delta, Tower park, Wimpy's and Brenda spent summers on a private island near discovery bay. We should hook up...
    Bob

    Par,
    again you have positive, useful information. Thank you!
     
  10. Tahoerover
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Nor Cal

    Tahoerover Junior Member

    I live on Smith Canal and keep my Gar Wood on a hoist spring and late summer. Running boats seem to all be at the lake right now! I will have the Gar Wood back after the North lake wooden boat show.
    I mostly hang out at Windmill Cove
     

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  11. rhtmarine
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    Damn that's an awesome set up you got there. I've heard of windmill cove, where about's is that?
    That's very cool. I would like to meet you and chat it up.
    I removed the rest of that foul bottom yesterday and bought a beautiful hunk of mahogany to re-do the keel. After that and two frame replacements, I'll be ready to start fitting ply and planks...Having a ball with this thing.
     
  12. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    That is a quadraconic hull, isn't it?
     
  13. rhtmarine
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    What the heck is a quadraconic hull? I know it as a solid mahogany mono hull. I think you are on the tonic...
     
  14. Nurb
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: IL

    Nurb Junior Member

    Frank Huckins design starting in 1928
    Huckins Yachts in Jacksonville FL trademarked the term "Quadraconic hull" in 2005.
     

  15. rhtmarine
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: santa cruz,ca

    rhtmarine Junior Member

    Thank you Nurb, nice explaination. I don't think so in regards to my hull. no concave. it's all pretty flat. deadrise does increarse some moving forward on the hull. What I like about this hull, is it was the first of the utility boats to include a non-trip. I know in my model race boats, that helps them turn.
    thanks for the info, Bob
     

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