1959 Johnson 9.9 outboard

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by dgjones, Jun 5, 2009.

  1. dgjones
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    dgjones dgjones

    Hello, I am thinking about purchasing a 1959 Johnson outboard 9.9. The seller told me that I need to buy a "pressurized" gas tank. Is anyone familiar with this motor? Thanks
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Those are called "dumpers" because of the amount of oil they leave behind in the water. Some of those old motors send compression into the tank to push the fuel to the carburetor. If you want to pollute a lake, nothing beats one of those Johnsons.
     
  3. dgjones
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    dgjones dgjones

    Thanks for the info. What would you recommend as a good cheap 9.9 outboard for my boat? I heard Nissan is a good buy.

    Thanks for the help
     
  4. Rangerspeedboat
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    Rangerspeedboat Senior Member

    That johnson is probably a good runing little outboard. Instead of a pressurized gas tank, a little fuel pump should work. Oh no, pollution.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Tohatsu makes Nissan and Mercury motors up to 9.9HP. If you buy them in blue they are cheaper. They are really good motors.
     
  6. Wynand N
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    actually, Tohatsu supply all Mercury's two stroke engines up to 50hp and the complete Mercury four stroke line.
    The other day a chap walked into my showroom, looked at a 15hp Tohatsu (we are local Tohatsu dealer in my town) and was shocked to see it is the same (even detailing) as the Mercury 15hp he had just bought at 30% more...
    All our 2009 model Tohatsu two stroke engines are "Mercury" black with same red sticker across the cowling side with just the name different.
     
  7. dgjones
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    dgjones dgjones

    tohatsu

    How much does a tohatsu 9.9 cost?
     
  8. thudpucker
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    Those old OMC 9.9's are a lot better than those guys are leading you to belive.
    That's a Two-hose tank setup. A bad thing...OMC realized it and converted to a Single hose in the 60's.
    That old OMC was a 25:1 oiler. A real slimer at Idle.
    If you get a good buy on it, less than $100 you can convert it to a Single hose and use one of the new tanks, and with the newer Oils you can go to the 50:1 Mix all the newer outboards use.

    Here's two links to what you need to know.
    http://www.sschapterpsa.com/ramblings/Converting_dual_fuel_line.htm
    http://outboard-boat-motor-repair.com/johnson/Pressureized Fuel Tanks.htm
     
  9. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I have a Nissan 5hp, a friend has Mercury 6hp, the engines seem identical in all regards including power. Do you know difference?

    By the the way, I also have 15hp Evinrude which is same 9.9 hp with a different carb I believe. It is an excellent motor once you upgrade to single line, 50:1 mix. Lots of power runs great. Unbreakable. The two stroke is much lighter per hp than 4 stroke. I hate little nissan, every time I move it around I get oil in carb and have to remove spark plug at launch. You talk about oil in water. YEah, if you hold perfectly straight or in its correct side it does not happen, but it does.
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    thudpucker:
    nobody said they are bad. It is a fact that they dump more oil in the water than they burn though. Whether that is something you care about or not is another matter.
     
  11. thudpucker
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    I do care Gonzo and your wrong of course. And you did allude to the old OMC's being bad for oil spillage.
    I dont think you can show them to Dump more than they use. I've never seen that happen.

    What MAY happen if the Mixer isn't careful, is a little too much oil with each mix, over time, will have the engine smoking.

    Dumping oil means a fuel leak somewhere. Your exaggerations arent helping anything.
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Thudpucker: either you haven't ever started an old outboard and seen the oil sleek or you are just being obnoxious. The new technology was forced on manufacturers to prevent the oil being dumped in the water.
     
  13. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Yes, the old 2 stroke engines are not very clean to the water but they are not as bad at this argument goes either. By using modern oils at 50:1 ratio, the amount getting into the water is cut in half right off the bat. Proper tuning and mixture settings of the carb will further reduce the oil but nothing will make them as clean as a four stroke or DFI engine.

    There are an awful lot of good reliable old 2 strokes out there at very good prices and parts for Johnson-Evinrudes are in good supply. Bolt on fuel pumps are available to eliminate the need for the problem prone pressurized fuel tank. Frankly, I consider it an individual call on whether it is reasonable to run one of them in the local waters or not. In some places, it would be a significant issue, while in other places, it would be negligible. Natural oil seepage from the ocean bottom is several orders of magnitude greater. Runoff from our cars on the roads and parking lots dwarfs oil from outboards.

    Not to minimize pollution from outboards but we should keep it in perspective.
     
  14. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I agree. Has anyone tried running them with less than 50:1 ratio? The old oils would break down diluted more than that. It makes me thing that it was not really needed. Also, in tht 50's they used straight 30 oil.
     

  15. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    I have a 1987 Yamaha 8hp that runs on 100:1 oil ratio. Since I am a little conservative, I always fudge that a bit and also add "Ring Free" to keep the rings from sticking when the engine sets up for a while. When I first got this engine, the pistons were frozen, perhaps from too little oil. Still have this engine and it still runs well. I run my 1980 Evinrude 25 at 50:1 oil ratio. It smokes a little when first fired but not so much thereafter. Neither of these engines is used a lot. Three older two strokes are not used at all.
     
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