1958 Gale Redfish Flooring repair

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by rwl_1969, Nov 23, 2007.

  1. rwl_1969
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Austin, TX.

    rwl_1969 New Member

    I have a 1958 Gale Redfish shark. The boat was full of water and rotted the wood between the two layers of fiberglass. I have cut out and removed the top flooring and started replacing the floor with pieces of Lyptus wood. Once I have placed the majority of the wood I intend to lay a piece of plywood over it and then fill the void with foam. After words I will glass the edges and then carpet the flooring. I am just wondering if adding this much weight from the wood to the floor will affect the boat handing. The boat is 15.5 from bow to stern and 5 feet wide. My question is this a good way to repair the flooring, as I have already replaced half of the flooring.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are many previous threads on this site addressing just what you are doing. I'm not sure why you've elected to use solid wood and then cover it with plywood. Plywood is all you need and much better suited then solid in this application.

    The wooden pieces should be well coated with epoxy, if you expect not to have to do this again. Once well coated, then 'glassed into the hull shell with fabric to waterproof it and form a structural bond with the hull.

    Carpeted decks are the biggest cause of rotting wooden pieces. It traps moisture against the sole (the floor) and this eventually gets into the wood. There are a few different treatments you can use on the sole that will not cause this trapped moisture issue. Textured paint, textured 'glass, veneer inlays, to name a few.

    Additional weight is the enemy of all small boats. You may have to shift around tanks or batteries to get her to trim properly if you start adding weight, where there was none before.

    Do a search on this site on sole repair. You'll get plenty of previous posts to gather up information and options.
     
  3. rwl_1969
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Austin, TX.

    rwl_1969 New Member

    Par, thanks for the comment, I have read the post. The problem is I started the project before I joined, that is why I asked the question. I just do not want to have to cut the hard wood out of the hull now that it is in. It is about half way complete and I want the boat to handle as good as it is going to look, Safety first.

    Ronnie
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You don't have to cut out the solid stuff if you don't want to. Your trim can be adjusted. Use just the plywood for the rest and live and learn. Post some pictures of this old gal. Does it have tail fins?
     
  5. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    im with par,,i'd like to see her :)
     

  6. rwl_1969
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Austin, TX.

    rwl_1969 New Member

    I will take some photos and post them.
     
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