16ft surf launchable plywood boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Paul D, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    I am building the 32' demountable Skoota in foam. It has beaching keels with sacrificial wood strips.

    The garage is no problem. You could either build it in sections and do some work out in front or you could narrow the boat, but I would NOT narrow the boat..don't even like to mention.

    Just build the hulls and then the cabin base inside and paint the bits and move them outside in sections.

    It would be an easy and fun build. Trailer will be the most complicated bit; not the boat.

    Good luck!
     
  2. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks mate ...yea something could be worked out with my garage....
    Yea thats what i was thinking just add strips of wood to the bottom for protection thatz what ive done to my punt ive built ....cheers
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
  3. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Wondering how would the skoota 18 perform in rough conditions with single motor central on boat....ive read power catamarans can struggle turning in rough with one motor central ....is that because of the width between the two hulls?....or?
    Or has the skoota design sorted that problem?...
    Thanks
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Richard can design a wider transom bracket and you can run twins. I don't like to speak for him, but I believe he said this elsewhere. Another possibility might be to build the hulls with a motor mount; not sure. These are questions for Richard.

    Personally, I think you would definitely expect poorer steering from a Skoota than an open skiff with the same single engine mount.

    The tradeoffs are massive for the steering loss.

    On the other hand twin engines and a helm on a Skoota will be better steering than any skiff.

    I don't see why a couple 20s wouldn't be ideal.

    If it came down to money; a longer transom bracket that would suit two motors in the future would be my advise. Then you can start with one and add another later.

    Money no matter, I'd prefer engines on the hulls, but that might not be what Richard does.
     
  5. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks, i will see what Richard says....
    I seen one skoota on youtube with motors on the hulls....be good to have two motors out at sea but its also more cost like you say....
    I may have to forget about the skoota for now shes may be bit over my budget range ...see what happens anyway ....thanks mate
     
  6. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: NZ

    IronPrice Senior Member

    Hey Paul - I was thinking about this a while ago too. Here is the thread https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/beach-launch-compact-fishing-design.58258

    there may be some useful info in there for you.

    In the end I found something I really liked the look of from a South African kayak manufacturer UNO Skiff - Light, versatile and fun for all ages - Stealth Kayaks http://stealthkayaks.co.za/kayak-range/uno-skiff/

    BTW if you want to protect you hull consider carborundum-epoxy paste. It's what the guys who operate glass jet boats in shallow rivers use Norski | NZ Manufacturers of Chemical & Fibreglass Craft Products | Others http://www.norski.co.nz/others.php
     
  7. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks for the info mate...
    Im still havent settled on a plywood boat design yet but will look into that epoxy paste once i get there cherz....and like your thread i would definitely like a design that gets rid of water quickly ...self bailing etc...
    Anyway thanks
     
  8. JESEMD
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Location: PA, USA

    JESEMD New Member

    I don’t know if it has been mentioned here yet, but google the headwater 16 and 18 by Tracy O’Brien. They are Oregon dorys made to be launched and recovered from the beach. Easy stitch and glue construction and mine has been solid as a rock the few times I have had it offshore. It is flat bottomed so it will beat you up bit in a chop but it has high freeboard and is self bailing and it will get you home. 30 hp is plenty for the 16 as it is really a semi-displacement hull and will only go so fast no matter what. Mine is built with a transom mounted outboard but he includes plans for a well also. I believe he has pilot house plans available as well. No connection to me other than I have one and it sounded like what you were looking for.

    If you are insterested I am more than happy to give you all the ups and downs of the boat before you buy plans.
     
  9. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    I have a Simmons sea skiff 18- actually 17' 1" that is really a light dory sort of boat that is designed for "light" surf use, and plans are available. It is quite a bit like the bateau 18, but uses lapstrake ply and mounts the engine in a well. They are well respected and tuff little boats about the size you are looking for. There is a website dedicated to them.
    Bruce
     
  10. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    I'd be cautious about anything too flat bottomed in a beach launch. In my experience, you need a bit of vee to cross surf safely.

    Small boats I've had that are good in the surf have had a high and sharp (ideally flared bow), with a low dead rise in the aft sections of the hull. The better ones have had a 'gullwing' hull form or reverse chines in the aft sections.
    A sharp and highish bow helps punch through/over surf on the way out - you need some lift but not too much when you hit a breaker. It also lessens the risk of burying the nose f you off the front of a wave coming back in.

    Some vee along the vessel's length assists tracking, which can be very important coming back in through surf.

    A shallow vee at the aft end helps stability at rest. Reverse chines or a 'gull wing' form in the aft sections of the hull help with tracking and stability at rest.

    I've found if you run a boat like I've described onto sand at pace*, it will run up the beach to a safe position for jumping out. The vee hull will ensure it stays there rather than being floated and sucked back out by a retreating wave. Once the wave retreats you can jump out and drag the boat onto dry-ground.

    * It's important that the outboard is set to kick up when it hits the sand!

    Disclaimer - the above is not empirically derived. It's purely observational - based on using, abusing and on occassion capsizing boats in the surf.
     
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  11. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    IP, the simmons is pretty much as you suggest, with a shallow v forward, a flat planing run aft with a high bow and stern. With the engine in a well, the very raked transom is free to lift the stern. It does work.
    B
     
  12. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: NZ

    IronPrice Senior Member

    I struggling to see how you would land that on a beach with the outboard in a well - how high could you tilt it??
     
  13. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    IP, have you looked at the Simmons site? "simmonsseaskiff.org" The transom is open, the motor tilts through it- lots of photos on the site. Pretty simple! With the engine up, mine will float in about 8" of water. With engine and equipment it weighs under 600 lbs so it is pretty easy to handle.
    I have no idea if it would suit Paul's needs, but they evolved in an area of the USA east coast that is pretty demanding of boats.
    B
     
  14. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks Jesemd ...i had a look at those plans mainly because flat bottom boats are simpler and cheaper to build and his design looked quite good...ive been warned about about them pounding a bit in the chop..have u built the 16ft version?...
     

  15. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: NZ

    IronPrice Senior Member

    I did check out the site, but I didn't notice the transom opening.

    Personally I don't see the need for a well. Just cover the outboard and don't let the waves catch you.

    Not trying to be critical, just don't understand why. It takes up a lot of room.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
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