16ft surf launchable plywood boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Paul D, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    OK, I think to proceed meaningfully here, a few things need to be expanded upon. What is the nature of the beach(s) you intend to launch off ? Is it a beach with a shore dump, or is there a gutter in close, that allows easier launch/retrieval ? If conditions are difficult, a boat needs to be rugged to withstand the bottoming out that will occur, with some force, from time to time. What usually happens is that practical experience leads to certain boats, with certain methods of launch and retrieval, being adopted, all according to the local conditions, and lessons learnt about what is most effective. A couple of things that would seem mandatory, are keeping weight down, and having a hull made from a material that isn't going to bust or be easily damaged by being dragged over sand or gravel, or dropped hard by a shore dump. Aluminium probably best answers those requirements. But as I say, it depends on the local situation, if you are able to launch in a relatively sheltered location, it becomes much less problematical, in choice of boat, type of tow vehicle, use of such things as extendable tow bars, number of people required to launch safely, etc.
     
  2. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Okay i try to narrow it down for you thank you.....sandy beaches...reasonably sheltered surf sometimes medium to tiny.... I'm only going to sea on a good day ...but need a boat that can handle it if you get caught out...
    Room for 2 to 3 people fishing....
    small family of 4 for cruising up chilling out...
    16ft to 18ft max in length..
    Smallish outboard so easy planning boat...
    Got to be able to handle sea conditions....
    Im set on building a plywood boat i know its not everyone's cup of tea that's what my interest is ...im sure they can handle reasonable punishment built properly.....but i hear what your saying......
    River use for fishing as well...harbour trolling..
    Tiller steer...center console?.. I'm still not sure..tiller would b easier on wallet
    Anyway that's about most of it i can think of..sorry if i haven't been clear about my purposes for a boat I'm new to forums...but any advice is much appreciated...thank you
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't know how rugged the old "beachie" ( a slightly smaller version of the "Oceaneer") was, and how long they lasted, but I recall many in use by beach-launching pro fisherman, way back in the day. When alloy entered the scene, they were largely abandoned, probably because of lower maintenance, lower weight etc, and a stand-out alloy design ( Clark Abalone) that was vastly superior in sea ability than the typical early aluminium "dory". One of those is a reasonable choice even today, but they were pretty wet conveyances, and in NZ, that would be a problem.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Broaching or swamping, as I said on the other forum, would be my primary concern. Not to compare the two, but avoid a cutdown transom and personally I say no to tiller. Much easier to hit a trim button at the helm and have a full transom to avoid waves coming over the transom. Plus the weight of the helmsman doesn't affect draft as much for'd.

    Aluminum comes in light and bottom bang only hurts transducer. You can hull shoot the ducer to avoid damage.

    Your primary concerns ought to be safe launch and land.

    Follow by sea handling.

    Draft is important. Obvious, but not to be missed... less draft will be easier at the beach. Lighter is also good, in general. If anything goes wrong and you say ? miss the trailer, a light enough craft without bottom grabbing features like transducers or rocker? can be manually handled. The more you add, like pilothouse, the heavier the boat might get.

    You can also graphite the bottom of any type of hull for a scratch resistant bottom.

    Landing a boat in rough weather on a shallow beach is the most difficult way to land a boat.

    If you come in motor down; the skeg can catch when the bow hits the trailer and a couple waves and the boat is sunk on the beach.

    Happened to me once. All my fault simply forgot to trim up.

    Good luck!
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is a God-awful task to launch and retrieve anything, if contending with a shore dump. Sometimes you see boats on their trailer being reversed at speed down the beach, with someone inside, the vehicle driver brakes heavily, the boat goes flying off into the water with enough momentum to get into enough depth to then be driven into a holding pattern waiting for the trailer to be parked, and that other person to wade into the water, and go aboard, all of this being a matter of nice judgement and timing. A two-man job at least.
     
  6. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Yea there are a few good wee aluminium boats in new zealand to for sale stabicraft...kiwikraft..etc...and they really proven designs...
    Im looking forward to building a sea capable boat just have to decide on the right design and go for it....but the oceaneers plans are a little on the pricey side for me at the moment i know bateaus and glen l etc plans are half that price....
    The beach i will be launching at is pretty good most the time but theres no way im heading out if its not suitable...cheers guys
    Thanks fallguy ....you guys will have alot more experience than me so really appreciate the advice.... i used to surf a bit and dive for paua etc
    so i got reasonable understanding of the breakers tides and current...but a novice when it comes to boats but i won't be heading out if its rough im not that keen..
    Anyway be good to hear a couple of worthy plywood boat designs that are suited to my purposes...the oceaneer although it maybe good design was a bit expensive for the plans ....new zealand plans arent much different in price .....
    Im planning on buying materials for the boat as i go so can even the expenses over a year or hopefully not 2.....
    Anyway cherz guys....ive got thoughts of the FS17....OB17....From bateau....headwaters 18 ft dory by tracey obrien....16ft cabin skiff by glen l....candlefish by devlin....
    Will find photos and put them up....thats what i have in mind so far .....cheers
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
  7. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Have a couple photos here guys hopefully be able to get some thoughts on them
    FS17 bateau ...good reviews on it im not sure though...thought i might need more height at sides to keep kids in lol...
    images-1.jpg next ob17 looks similar looks to fs17 maybe the bows more raised im no expert tho... images-3.jpg
    Next is tracy obriens pacific dory ...16ft headwaters i was thinking id go 18ft
    images-4.jpg
     
  8. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    images-4.jpg
    this is the headwater this is 16ft

    Next is glen l 16ft cabin skiff maybe a bit to bigger build for me but could modify it maybe...
    images-5.jpg

    And candlefish by devlin boats
    11-768x1024.jpg That's where I'm at guys any thoughts on these designs.... I know there are others so any thoughts opinions be great thanks
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Typically, how far will you travelling, from the point of the beach launch ?
     
  10. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    1 to 2kms at most for cod fishing...and closer in for diving maybe
     
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  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Right, well the ability to deal with choppy water, in terms of ride comfort, doesn't really enter the equation, when the "ordeal" is only going to last a few minutes at most. I would be more interested in dryness (you only need to get wet once, to stay wet) and a boat that will "surf" well, without broaching, in the run into the beach. To this end, something simple like this would suffice, 16 feet or so, side panel 2 feet width that is a simple cylindrical development, similarly the the bottom, all parallel sections. 12-15 degree constant deadrise. Some of the boats you illustrated may be fairly close shape wise. PictureA 014.jpg
     
  12. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I might look at Richard Wood's Skoota 20 as well.

    It might make a much better dive boat and be beachable.

    Hopefully Richard can speak to its ability to beach better.

    The right trailer mods and you might land it dry footed so to speak.

    The best thing is it would be impossible to swamp and if you don't build a cabin; not sure broaching would be a disaster as in all bucket designs.

    Skoota 20 powercat by Woods Designs http://power-catamaran-designs.com/skoota20.htm
     
  13. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks .....yea its not that far out really...people go a lot further 10kms or so for cod....if i got my abilities up and felt confident i may follow someone out that far....but you can catch fish in closer....and troll for salmon not far out to....trolling was the main reason i wanted a little shelter house on the boat but its more a convenience...i don't need it...
    Thanks for the sketch mate ....do u design boats ?
    Yea i think most those boats I've chosen should do the job then ...the headwaters dorys a flat bottom i may leave that out but the designer Tracy obrien has another design called the predator its a v hull med-img-predphot.jpg
    so im putting that in the mix to...like i say I'm only picking perfect days to go out fishing anyway....
    Got some decisions to make...cheers
     
  14. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Thats interesting never would of thought of something like the skoota definitely outside the square...she would be a bit more complexed in building id say ..but yea its got its place ...
    I will stick to a simple hull form
    for my second build though..

    thanks for the input tho mate
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You would be wise to avoid flat bottomed dories, in any ruffled waters, that rough illustration I posted probably represents the simplest ply boat type that would give reasonable service, and ease and cheapness of build. I'd say at least 12 degrees of vee, but closer to 15 probably, for a little better ride, you would have a boat that could run well with 30 hp, at 15 knots or so, be reasonably dry in the sort of conditions you would want to be out fishing, and be a stable enough fishing platform. An added bonus, the shape would work well when coming ashore, not digging in to the sand, and having the stern swing around.
     
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