14ft Wooden Runabout Restoration

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Jeff Vanderveen, Jul 2, 2020.

  1. Jeff Vanderveen
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    Hello,


    I’m new to the forum and super-new to wooden boats. I’m attempting a restoration of a 14ft runabout, hopefully not biting off more than I can chew. I’m stumped on finding any information on this type of hull or how to repair it. There is significant rot in the bottom rear of the hull, and the transom area in general will need a lot of work, if not a full replacement. Looking at the top edge of the hull it definitely shows five 1/16” layers which to my limited knowledge could mean cold-molded but maybe it’s plywood? With no frames or inner support structure I’m at a loss on how to replace the strips of veneer.


    Any help or guidance at all would be greatly appreciated.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Welcome to the Forum Jeff.

    You can download a free copy of the Gougeon Brothers' book on boat construction (it mentions a lot about repair as well) here -
    Gougeon Brothers on Boat Construction book - WEST SYSTEM Epoxy https://www.westsystem.com/the-gougeon-brothers-on-boat-construction/

    Although this is like a large bible - it might be easier to start off with this smaller book about wooden boat restoration and repair -
    https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/0617-Wooden-Boat-Manual.pdf
     
  3. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    You have to scarf in a patch made out of plywood or custom molded if there is 2 direction curvature.
     
  4. Jeff Vanderveen
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    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    How would I clamp the patch into place? Most of what I've seen on Youtube and various Google searches would be clamping the patch via staples or screws to the frames.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    There is a considerable amount of rot. The bottom is plywood, but the sides are molded. Whether hot or cold molded is not possible to tell by the photos. Do you want a quick and dirty repair to run the boat for a couple of years? Scarfing plywood patches is possible. You cut all the rotted material out, make a bevel and then match a patch of the same size with opposite bevels. It will be quite time consuming if you haven't done it before. You should get plywood scraps and practice before cutting the boat. The most important thing, which is where most amateur repairs fail, is to not brace the hull to keep it from deforming. When you remove the transom, the hull will behave like a cardboard box with one side removed; it will be very flimsy. You need to make patterns and secure the to the hull before cutting.
     
  6. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    When you remove a piece, use it as a template for the replacement piece to assure a good fit before discarding it..
     
  7. Jeff Vanderveen
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    My intention is to do the restoration as 'correctly' as possible. I was thinking that I might have to brace the hull before removing the transom, I'll definitely do that. I may build in more braces along the inside of the hull as well to help maintain the shape.

    When I'm replacing sections of the hull would it be advisable to build braces/forms/patterns on the inside of the hull and use screws or staples to clamp the scarf joints? Is stapling or screwing through the hull material to clamp it a no-no?
     
  8. Jeff Vanderveen
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    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    I have been doing that for the top layers that I'm currently removing.
     
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  9. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Just make sure any hole you create in wood is permanently sealed against water seeping into it. That is a major cause of rot.
     
  10. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    If there is no structure inside you create some. Plywood pieces covered in tape for example. Thickened epoxy does not need high clamping pressure to work.
     
  11. Jeff Vanderveen
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    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    Okay, thanks!
     
  12. Jeff Vanderveen
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    Thanks! I've seen this book referenced a lot, I appreciate the link.
     
  13. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    This is an example on how a patch can be done in a plywood plank. The tools used were: jigsaw, hammer, chisel, drill and handplane

     
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  14. Jeff Vanderveen
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: Dunnville, ON, Canada

    Jeff Vanderveen Junior Member

    Thanks! That looks achievable, thankfully the hull will be fiberglassed and painted so if my joints look less-than at least it'll be covered :)
     

  15. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Jef, when you mention that the hull will be 'fibreglassed and painted', do you intend to use epoxy or polyester re the fibreglassing aspect?
     
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