14' sportster plans

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by learningtheway, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. learningtheway
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: USA

    learningtheway Junior Member

    Hello,

    I was looking through the plans for the 14' sportster (http://boatdesign.net/boat-plans-archive/1200-15-sportster-construction.gif)

    and began to wonder about a few things maybe you experts could verify for me.

    Is the frame sizes really only 3/4"x2" thick? and spruce?
    Will that be strong enough? Could I use white oak instead to be at ease?
    Would making them a little bigger say 1x3 or whatever your suggestion is have a bad affect?

    Any other critiques on the design that would interest me would also be appreciated

    Thanks LTW
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    All home boat builders have the tendency to overbuild and it really is not necessary, but we like to build tanks. I could not get a clear view of your postings but go to Glen-L boat designs and look at similiar designs in outboards and so forth. they show the lumber needed to build each plan and it's dimensions. You will see that your plan and one of theirs of the same size, all designed by NAs, will be very similar. So unless you plan on using it in lakes with tree stumps sticking up I would not make it heavier and slower.
     
  3. thudpucker
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    Years ago I had an old boat almost exactly like that. It was Planked though.
    Yes those seemingly small ribs will be fine.
    White Oak wont ever Rot on you if you keep it dry. It's gonna hold a screw so well you cant hardly get it out.
    But other lighter woods will out last your grandchildren if you take care to keep it dry.
    Go ahead and use those plans, but do check out the Glen-L site for a larger variety of similar plans.
     
  4. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    I think the frames are large enough even of spruce. I would not use spruce though since it is not a durable wood. Cedar would be better in that regard. This looks like nice little boat although it appears to be dated. Many use monocoque construction these days with glued laps and interior seat/tanks along the sides for structural rigidity. This makes for a much cleaner design with less places for crap and water to accumulate and start rot. Light weight is very important for a small boat if it is to perform well.
     
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  5. learningtheway
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    learningtheway Junior Member

    Sorry could you help me out with monocoque
     

  6. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    Monocoque is a unitized type of construction where the main loads are taken by the shell. An egg would be a perfect example in nature. A boat is not a complete shell like an egg and needs some other components to make it rigid. Usually the internal furniture, decks and or the bulkheads provide this function. All modern cars, aircraft and most boats utilize this type of construction which maximizes strength to weight ratios.
     
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