110 out of 220?

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by tropicalbuilder, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. jonr
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Great Lakes

    jonr Senior Member

    Yes, the extra breaker is OK. But should be breakers (plural), since each circuit needs one.
     
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  2. botanybay
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Redondo Beach, USA

    botanybay Junior Member

    Watch out for 208 power on USA Docks

    Just to muddy the waters further (I have a English vessel in the US).

    About half of the docks on the west coast of the USA are two phases out of a three phase circuit rather than split phase.

    What this means is that you either get 240V (2 phases of 120V which are 180 degrees out of phase) or 208V (2 phases of 120V which are 120 degrees out of phase).

    If you are not using the neutral at all the difference shows up purely as low voltage but it is pretty low. Most european equipment will run as it is about 22V low or about 10% and just barely within spec.

    However, if dock power sags (due to heavy load from your vessel or your neighbors) the voltage can dip below 200V.

    David
     
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  3. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Herman Senior Member

    In NL it is basicly the same: 400 volts 3-phase + N, which converts nicely to 3x 230V. Users are spread between the 3 phases. (for users, read houses, or outlets on the jetty). Some houses have 3 phases, depending on their needs. In that case the different circuits in the house are spread over the 3 phases.

    I believe this is common practice throughout Europe.

    However, in NL rarely you encounter 2x115V @ 180 degrees, which gives 230V at the outlet. (Delft, for instance). This is less known and can generate interesting problems. Only tip I can give: Never lick "neutral"...
     
  4. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    In these rare cases the distribution company still uses split phase transformers with the center tap grounded. To normalize the circuit, the ground should be moved to one of the phases, but that would cause approx. 50% of all the homes connected to have a live blue wire and a brown neutral.

    That would mean the other 50% then have the correct wire colors, but somehow this offends the power company more than the current situation where both brown and blue are live (??).
     
  5. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Herman Senior Member

    It is all about money, I guess....
     

  6. botanybay
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Redondo Beach, USA

    botanybay Junior Member

    Definitely about the money ***Grin***

    Many US marinas now provide 208V rather than 240V power because it saves about $300/slip when the power system is being installed.

    Because the cost of burning out 240V equipment is born by the boat owner the marina has little or no reason to take that into consideration when making the choice.
     
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