101 design principles

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by peter radclyffe, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    can anyone give me a link, thank you
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Peter

    I am curious, why have you selected 101 design principals...why not 99 or 200 or 50....why exactly one hundred and one?...i didn't know there was an exact number!:)

    What is it in particular, you wish to know?
     
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  3. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    thanks, i may have misunderstood, but somewhere i thought there was a reference to some design rules that every N A had to know, it may be called something else, which is why i cant find it on search
     
  4. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Try 102.

    Just kidding of course.

    Sorry, I don't know of what publication you speak.

    -Tom
     
  5. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

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  6. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    thanks, this ive read
     
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  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Peter,

    Do you mean rules, like Classification Society rules, or do you mean basic "rules of thumb" for designing XXX or YYY type of boat?

    If you mean "rules of thumb", these are varied and all come with major caveats which require an understanding of what are the limitations, and why. This comes with a certain degree of 'understanding' too.

    Best way, would be to invest in a basic naval architecture book.

    PS...if you want a quick and dirty summary, try Wynand's website:
    http://5psi.net/?q=node/310
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

  9. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    i have philips-birt, skenes, chappelles, f a o,leather, lloyds, s f i a & dixon kemp, i thought daniel skira or someone else maybe referred to some design principles discussing b s, i must have been mistaken
     
  10. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Ad Hoc 101 is an expression for the first step of knowledge of a profession.

    Daniel
     
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  11. DMacPherson
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    DMacPherson Senior Member

    Perhaps the poster meant "Design Principles 101"? You know, like the university numbering, "Beer Making 101"...

    Even so, I doubt you'll find anything really substantial in something that is a "101"-type list. You listed a number of excellent resources. It is not an accident that naval arch school takes four years, and then the real learning happens.
     
  12. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Some books:

    Francis Kinney's Skene's element of yacht design, on sale here by a member IKE,
    The Lloyd's rules and regulations for the constructions and classification of wood and composite yachts 1966, (classic construction mostly)
    Naval architecture two volume by the SNAME.
    Larsson Eliasson Principles of yacht design
    Wood: A manual for its use as a shipbuilding material by the US NAVY
    Baader The sailing yacht
    Theoretical naval architecture by Attwood and Pengelly
    Principle of ship satbility by Taylor and Trim


    I hope it can help.

    Daniel
     
  13. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    I think with a good spectre of books, some good tools to draw (expensive!), a lot of patience you can start designing a nice little boat, for the sake of it.
    Peter is a first class boatbuilder, it will not difficult for him to start.
    The most important, is understanding the importance of weight distribution, always put aside in many books.
    Daniel
     
  14. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Daniel

    I "googled" it....here:
    http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/671281

    "..It used to be common for colleges, particularly in America, to give the various courses numbers. The 100 series for the first year, the 200 series for the second and the 300 series for the third. And of course -01 would be the simplest course, the foundation module, that everybody had to take; they then oftn had choices from higher number courses, so not everybody took, say, 123.

    So "Something 101" is the very basic entry level stuff that everybody is supposed to have learned long ago...."


    Sorry, I'm not American hence didn't have a clue what "101 blah blah" meant. I do now.

    Bit confused though...if it 'basic entry level stuff', the reference should be to a school course not a college/university course. Since going to college/university, it is assumed one has learnt the basic's...such as integration, or mechanics etc, and thus, just learning more!

    Oh well....:eek:
     

  15. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    It's use for everything here. the 101 of cooking, the 101 of driving. You know we take something and we transforme it on pop culture ;)
    Daniel
     
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