100' Supermaxi

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by usa2, Jun 10, 2005.

  1. usa2
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    usa2 Senior Member

    ok, i was bored so i decided to pose this little challenge. Say that we people on this forum were going to collaborate on a supermaxi. what would you guys add to it. For the sake of not starting an argument, we will say it has a canting keel with the forward foil type to be determined by this years Sydney to Hobart Race.
    Anyone have any ideas?
     
  2. Doug Lord

    Doug Lord Guest

    Sydney -Hobart

    OK, I'll bite: was this race your way of introducing the 10° static heel test as a qualifying factor?
     
  3. usa2
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    usa2 Senior Member

    no. They have eliminated that rule in the S-H, and i thought it was stupid anyway and would not have payed attention to it. The reason i referred to the Sydney to hobart is because there will be TMF 100' and 90' going against 100' CBTF. Whichever performs better will be the choice of this imaginary design.
     
  4. Doug Lord

    Doug Lord Guest

    10°

    Thats very interesting. I hadn't heard that the 10° rule had been trashed-are you sure?
    If that's the case what a showdown it will be!
     
  5. usa2
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    usa2 Senior Member

    I heard something about it because Skandia/wildthing Yachting claims that their 30m monster is allowed to cant her keel to its fullest extent, so the rig is much larger now, and she has essentially been turboed. Nicorette wont have any success in that race though. The boats to watch will be the 98+ footers.
     
  6. mackid068
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    I just would worry about any boat with a canting keel. Sydney-Hobart canting keel disasters are many.
     
  7. mackid068
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    How about an extremely quiet inboard engine? Sounds good. But seriously, how about making all rig components of kevlar/carbon-fiber composite
     
  8. usa2
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    usa2 Senior Member

    that would be a good idea. Do you know whether the carbon fibre rigging componenets now being made are good at withstanding shock loads? Carbon fibre in general hs a nasty habit of exploding under stress...
     
  9. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    A second hull.
     
  10. usa2
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    usa2 Senior Member

    "A second hull."

    than that would be a maxi cat, not a supermaxi.
     
  11. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    Exactly.

    What is the point of compromising the structural and watertight integrity of the hull by putting on a canting keel? It's complex to operate, and has vulnerable machinery that is safety critical. It renders the boat unsuitable for any use other than Grand Prix racing, unlike earlier generations of race boats where the investment in the boat yielded a second life as a cruiser. And for all that, you still have a slow boat.

    If you want to design a fast race boat, why not design a fast race boat?
     
  12. mackid068
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    Well, you COULD design a mini for just sailing around. A second hull that is actually a second hull, maybe not for racing, but how about making the primary hull out of the standard material and having an interior hull (much like the pressure hull of a submarine, though not for pressure) as a safeguard? Make it out of a buoyant material with a strong outer shell just before an airspace.

    something like this:

    Regular hull ----> Air space ----> Shell for secondary hull made of aramid ----> buoyant material ----> another layer just to divide buoyant material from interior ----> interior.
     
  13. usa2
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    usa2 Senior Member

    because as of now most major events are monohulls, and i am slightly biased towards monohulls. If i was trying to set all-out speed records, then i would go multi-hull. But im not, so why not stay with the monohull. Also, if one of these things was designed properly, it would be very seaworthy.
     
  14. mackid068
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    Monohulls have only slight advantages. Multihulls are nice and fast. I'll stick with this definition (which, if you replace certain aspects, works with all multi-hulls): Catamaran-A boat with two hulls, thereby two times more likely to hit a submerged object but will take two times longer to sink after hitting said object.
     

  15. astevo
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    astevo Junior Member

    good call that one, the whole talk of how high performance a maxi moni is really irrelevant when you consider how much faster a raft is. the fact is monos are good for close quarters racing but as a linehonors chaser the only thing keeping them relevant is mono-only races.
     
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