10-12 foot flat bottom boat

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by aaronbrown, Apr 14, 2012.

  1. aaronbrown
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    aaronbrown New Member

    im looking at building a 10-14 foot flat bottom boat with a small casting platform up front with a livewell built into the middle seat and a rear seat for the captain thinking of a max of 15hp outboard just wondering if any one can give me an estimate of how much epoxy resin that id need
     
  2. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    That small of a boat will not work with a casting platform up front...unless it is as wide as the rest of the boat...you will need that for the buoyancy to keep you up and the bow of the boat out of the water. You probably won't need any epoxy if you build it right.
     
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  3. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I built a 14 like you described, 14 feet long overall, 4 feet wide, 2-1/2foot high. It was not small . Tried to make it light as possible. Built from 1x2s frame covered in 1/8 plywood, then fibre glass and then sealed in epoxy. Mistake didn't use enough epoxy, but boat last 4 years of heavy use. Eventually wood got soaked and rotted, boat was still solid but got too heavy. Used about 2gallons of resin and one of epoxy. It only cost $400 to build 8 years ago. Today I would with different materials, but I was in hurry, built that one in 3 days
     
  4. aaronbrown
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    aaronbrown New Member

    i was going to use 3/8-1/2 plywood and if you do a search on youtube of jon boat conversion you will see what im trying to build out of wood whole boat will be 4 foot wide

    mydauphin what was the max number of ppl in your boat at one time
     
  5. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    It wasn't a people boat as much as work platform. It could easily hold 4 people but I used it to fix Seawalls, I would load 10 bags of mix and two people and a mixing tray on it to do work. With big flat square bottom it could certainly hold weight, but trick was high sidewalls. Boat would travel between sites with one or two person with a 5 HP, prettytomm well. Note because of flat botttom with no keel, it would walk a little. It was easy to work with but it traveled at slight angle pending on currents and wind. As it got older and more concrete accumulated it stop planning and became slower.
     
  6. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I built a 9.5' pram the beam was 54" the floor was 41" the bottom was 3/8 the sides were 1/4.i built this boat S&G so i had fillets say 1.25" two layers of 4" tapes on the inside seams one on the outside then covered the hull with 6oz fiberglass then filled the weave,the inside had two coats of resin.
    i used 5 liters of epoxy resin and almost 1 liter of silver tips gel magic for the gluing..
    this was my first attempt at FG and epoxy,I'd' say i at least ended up either sanding off or waisting 10% of that.
     
  7. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    I built a 12 foot boat that just about fits your description. It is an FL12 from Bateau.com. Steve is right. You do not want to be standing up casting in a boat that small, unless you like getting wet. Be sure to wear your life jacket. see http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/fl12.html

    I used slightly more than a gallon of epoxy resin. Of course that does not include the 1/2 gallon of hardener. So your looking at buying 1 1/2 gallons of resin and a gallon of hardner. This is assuming you use resin and hardner that mix 2 parts epoxy, 1 part resin. There are brands that are 1:1.
     
  8. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I should add also that i used 2-1 epoxy so in total i used about 7 liters.

    you should have no problem standing in a boat that big as long as the floor is 40"min. and is flat like a jon.mine is only 9.5' and i have no problem standing casting a flyrod and im 6'6" 240lbs.
     
  9. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    But you're not standing on a platform at the bow like he wants to. His center of gravity will be over a foot higher, the bottom of the boat sweeps up so there is less buoyancy and stability and the nose will push down creating an angle to the platform that will make footing treacherous. Add it all together and it really isn't a good idea in something less than 16+ ft long and/or about 5 ft wide.
     
  10. aaronbrown
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    aaronbrown New Member

    well i hadnt planed on really standing but i get the point i was just going to put a short pedistal seat up there so that 4 ppl can fish some what comfortably
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I disagree in that a casting deck, with a pedestal seat can't be put on a boat this size. Counter balancing the engine, fuel tank(s), battery and possably other crew, should make this completely viable. Naturally, with a small boat, you'll want to be careful with movements and trim, but I don't see a problem here. I have a 15' flats boat clamming skiff design that incorporates a cast deck, with the seat and it works fine, seated, standing or lubberly tossing an anchor. I do agree you should take note of boat trim, but with some practice and time in the boat, you'll work out a technique for being on the foredeck without getting wet.
     
  12. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    "You're Gonna Need a Bigger Boat" Brody (Roy Schreider), Jaws, 1975
     
  13. aaronbrown
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    aaronbrown New Member

    now im wondering if i need to curve the bottom of the hull to create the bow or if i can just use another piece and angle the bow i only plan on useing it in a couple local small lakes and no plans on trying to break world speed records trying to get across the lake
     
  14. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You don't need to curve it, though a curve will help the ride and preformance a bit as well as the strength.
     

  15. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Nothing wrong with a flat bottom, might pound in rougher weather, and drive sideways, but best cargo haul, least draft, and easiest to get on plane if you can keep it light.
     
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