1/18 “42ft LONGBOAT ARMED FOR WAR 1834” model

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by yuen_sail, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    1/18 teak


    2011.1.20 keel
     

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  2. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Look'n Good !!!
     
  3. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    2011.1.21 keel
     

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  4. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Yuen_sail,
    Very nice job with fine workmanship but I would like to point something out. The wood you are using shows a coarse grain, which gives away the scale. Many museum models use English Limewood, Holly and Boxwood. Holly especially shows no grain, is moderately hard and easy to work. English Lime is supposed to be the very best.
    When wood with no visible grain is used, the model is just a little bit better rendition of the original boat.
    When I worked at Mystic Seaport Maritime Museum I spent as much time as possible looking over their collection of models, and little of the wood shows grain or anything that is out of scale.
    On movie ship models we have been using white pine and sugar pine. Of course at our bigger scale it's easier to hide the grain, but still it's a giveaway of the scale.
    Here are photos of two models of the same ship built for filming, one is 1/6 scale and the other 1/12. The 1/6 died a messy death but the 1/12 model is still around.
     

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  5. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    Teak is museum of specified materials. Sign this model of order before, I also mentioned that you said. Because I was originally NAVIGA C1 of athletes. But they didn't accept my advice. Perhaps this is the Oriental culture and western culture difference!
     
  6. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    Which one are you?
     
  7. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    In the first photo,
     
  8. hoytedow
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    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    Even with the large grain, the art is fine. Perhaps changing grain direction will make it less apparent. Good job, anyway.
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  10. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Here the 1/6 scale ship is under construction. This is a "pyro model" intended for an explosion so is designed specifically for that use, no other.
    Those two fellows in the earlier photo built the fine thing then gave it to me and the art department to damage it. I spent several weeks taking it from pristine to "end of battle", where it was required to be. Here I am pretending to put a fist through the thing.
    In the special effects model business all workers are very versatile because we seldom do the same job twice, just as no two of these miniatures are ever the same.
    On this one, my job was to break the model in a very controlled way, to plans from the studio art department, and age it to match the full-size sets the shot had to intercut with. This is so very different than other model making I think.
    These are built by teams of several craftsmen, and the computer and laser cutter are used a lot, both in cutting the framework from plywood to the lines plan and also in making all the fussy repetitive detail like window frames and such.
    The glass in the windows is microscope cover slides, very thin real glass that blows out nicely to scale in explosions.
    Also on this job I took the model to stage and represented the model and art departments among a crew of about 30 when we blew it up. This meant chopping and destroying all the perfect rigging done by the lady square rigger in the photo, and setting up the model for the camera crew, all broken and shot to pieces, gliding along after losing two masts, then BLAM! In the film you cannot tell what is a model, what is a full size set, and what is digital enhancement, it just all looks very real.
     

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  11. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    Amazing. Breaking eggs to make an omelet! It must be a bittersweet accomplishment.
     
  13. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    But sitting in the theatre, it's a pretty good omelet. Once a person asked if I was sad about making beautiful models, blowing them up, and throwing the result in the dumpster, and all I could say was, "We don't make models, we make movies", and it's still magic.
     
  14. hoytedow
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    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    Good answer.
     

  15. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Model madness. The last two are a 1/3 scale deck section for the same sequence the previous one was used on. Lots of explosions!
     

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