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  #1  
Old 03-07-2004, 08:45 PM
Charles Johnson Charles Johnson is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2004
Rep: 10 Posts: 3
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada USA
Confederacy Half hull

Hello All,
I recently discovered that a relative of mine served as a marine on the 32 gun frigate "Confederacy" (1781). The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich sold me a copy of the 5 existing drawings of this ship. They show, in quantitative detail, the form of the hull and the deck plans. Structural details and rigging are not shown.

The plan is to make a half hull for display. I visualize scaning the hull shape into my PC and then digitilize the form. From there it should be possible check the form, rescale, and plot out all of the necessary templates for a half hull construction. So much for concept. Now for the part wherein lives the devil.

Can someone recomend software reasonable in price, tactable to operate and which will not turn into a second career?

Thank You,
Charles Johnson
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  #2  
Old 03-07-2004, 11:57 PM
captword captword is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2004
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Location: Morehead City North Carolina
matbe someone else will come up with the answer that you want but propably the best way is to hire one of the members here to do it for you.
I am learning the art of tryng to get what my family has built by looks onto a computer
Howard
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  #3  
Old 03-08-2004, 01:27 AM
tspeer tspeer is offline
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Location: Des Moines, Washington, USA
It's not all that difficult to make the model yourself. Sugar pine is a nice, easily worked choice of material. Print out waterlines spaced according to the thickness of the wood (say, 3/4"). Cut out some station templates to use in checking the shape. Paper printouts glued to masonite is not a bad way to go for these.

Bandsaw the wood to the shape of the waterlines at the top of each piece, leaving a little margin for sanding, etc. Then carve away the outside corners of the "wedding cake" down to the inside corners. You can do a lot of shaping with 60 grit sandpaper wrapped around an appropriately sized block, or a round dowel to work the concave contours.

I'll bet you can do it in a couple of industrious weekends, and learn a lot in the process.

A school in Seattle builds models this way as an annual project. Check it out at
http://www.r-boat.org -> Pond Model -> Follow the progress of building the boats.
The kids eat it up - sharp instruments and molten metal; Cool!
__________________
Tom Speer
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  #4  
Old 03-08-2004, 10:50 AM
Charles Johnson Charles Johnson is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2004
Rep: 10 Posts: 3
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada USA
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by captword
matbe someone else will come up with the answer that you want but propably the best way is to hire one of the members here to do it for you.
I am learning the art of tryng to get what my family has built by looks onto a computer
Howard
We will see if there are any offers. Thanks for the suggestion.
C. Johnson
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  #5  
Old 03-08-2004, 10:55 AM
Charles Johnson Charles Johnson is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Rep: 10 Posts: 3
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada USA
Inspiring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tspeer
It's not all that difficult to make the model yourself. Sugar pine is a nice, easily worked choice of material. Print out waterlines spaced according to the thickness of the wood (say, 3/4"). Cut out some station templates to use in checking the shape. Paper printouts glued to masonite is not a bad way to go for these.

Bandsaw the wood to the shape of the waterlines at the top of each piece, leaving a little margin for sanding, etc. Then carve away the outside corners of the "wedding cake" down to the inside corners. You can do a lot of shaping with 60 grit sandpaper wrapped around an appropriately sized block, or a round dowel to work the concave contours.

I'll bet you can do it in a couple of industrious weekends, and learn a lot in the process.

A school in Seattle builds models this way as an annual project. Check it out at
http://www.r-boat.org -> Pond Model -> Follow the progress of building the boats.
The kids eat it up - sharp instruments and molten metal; Cool!
The r-boat.org sit is inspiring. They are using the bread and butter system I plan to use. Thanks for the lead.
C. Johnson
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