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  #1  
Old 10-22-2011, 01:49 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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Retirement boat

Hello Gang,


I am starting to plan for retirement and am looking for an ocean boat. When I retire, (10 years to go), we want to live back on the coast where we grew up. I have smaller boats for lakes, rivers and the bay. But Im a bit of a girl on the ocean and the bar. Im interested in a "leave in" boat thats decent size. I also have four military children and have a thing for military items myself.

I found a 40' ex Coast Guard boat that I really like. I like the lines, the history of that particular boat and the size seems about right. Its been stripped to bare steel and epoxied inside and out. Redone and epoxied fuel tanks with stainless lines. New stainless exhaust, brand new props, blowers non skid deck etc. Twin 671's and original morse controls and guage pod.

Im researching it before going to see it in person. I looked up the props which cost 6K alone online. It says the engines turn over and are ready to go.

Two of my sons want to buy a 35' CC with triple outboards to chase tuna and charter extra spaces. They use a 26' now. The boat they want is 150K. I just dont see the need to spend that much for what I want to do. This is much more boat for allot less money, or so it seems to me.

Other than getting a survey Id appreciate input you have.

Thanks in advance!



Chris
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  #2  
Old 10-22-2011, 03:25 PM
Wavewacker Wavewacker is offline
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I like it too, but you may have to wait awhile before the tide comes in to see if it floats.
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  #3  
Old 10-22-2011, 03:55 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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Yeah, looks high and dry there for sure. Its in a dry dock for now. My 20' sled is an ex army boat and its extremely stout. Im waiting for more pictures from the seller.
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  #4  
Old 10-22-2011, 04:50 PM
Chuck Losness Chuck Losness is offline
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To get good answers from the people who really know their stuff on this forum you should post your statement of requirements. The boat your are looking at may or may not meet your SOR. Just off the top of my head a 40 boat with twin 671 diesels will have to stop at every fuel dock that you happen to pass by. That usually doesn't work very well with the budget when you retire and join the ranks of the independently poor. But without a SOR you'll just bounce around with no direction to your search. Be sure to include your significant other's needs, wants and desires when you come up with your SOR.
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  #5  
Old 10-22-2011, 07:23 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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Hmmm, SOR?

* Big enough that I can go out on days that are less than bathtub conditions. Or better yet, dont pucker so bad coming back if it picks up outside. We went to Port Orford one day and it was perfect glass. 50' deep and see the bottom. BUT, in the afternoon coming back it was scary nasty on a 22' boat.


* Plenty of room to stay out of the way. Ive seen video of the boys with 6 tuna on at once. Wasnt pretty on a 26'. Theyve had so many fish on board it was close to overloaded. I wont put my riders in that situation. Takes quite a bit of ice for tuna. Space and weight there too.

* I figure this 40' would like fuel. But! It (the boat) cost 10% of the 35' the boys are looking at. It would be paid for except fuel and maint. So maybe its a wash? If i dont have extra cash for fuel, it stays at the dock. No payments to stress over.

* Big enough to explore up or down the coast? We have kids in Seattle and San Diego. Some other friends have gone around and up the entire eastern coast. Dont think Im that adventurous though.


As you say. This one may not be right at all. But it was catyalyst for thinking about the future. Its inexpensive to get into. Not scary amount to finish to get it ready to go. 671's are pretty common and may or may not need to go. Theyve been around in lots of applications for a long time. ????? Lots of questions to weed through.

Thanks, Chris
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  #6  
Old 10-23-2011, 04:04 AM
michael pierzga michael pierzga is offline
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Nice looking boat. It is a bit powerful. Big diesels need fuel and maintenece. I just spent 5 grand on an MTU service...Injector pump, injectors, filters, oil cooler...normal work.
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  #7  
Old 10-24-2011, 07:53 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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Hmmm. Just reading the history of these boats and the specs. One stood out. Sea trials called for fuel capacity to go from 228 gal. to 370 gal. This increased the range by 175 miles. So 140 gallons equals 175 miles. That would as stated above, eat up the dollars quickly.

Those 671's are only 190 hp. ea. Im sure theres something better.

My 23' Salty Pup is looking better and better.
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  #8  
Old 10-24-2011, 08:33 PM
cyclops2 cyclops2 is offline
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Who is buying you...YOUR boat ?

You & the wife ?

Or are the kids free loading off of you and your wifes last boat purchase ?

They can save & buy what they can afford in 20 more years.

When I retired I told the wife you pick a boat you like up to 19' long.

She picked a then brand new 2002 Chaparral 186 SSI bow rider in black & white, her choice. It is 8' wide. I did the engine & options.

Both still use it. Son in Law, dam good one, is the driver & loves it. I have a smaller 16' with a 1999 electric 9.9 hp for fishing in 10" of water & less.

Retirement SHOULD mean EASY starts everytime. A LITTLE cleaning the boat of spider poop. DONE!!! Time to ride & cruise.

If youare 30 years, buy the unfinished project for $ 500 & sell it still unfinished 10 years later for $ 700 + all the money poured into it over time.

Moral

Buy a brand new bowrider / cuddy cabin boat both of you love at a boat show. Test drive it at a dealer.

The Chaparral has cost me $0 for repairs. The 9.9 hp $ 68.
ALWAYS BUY NEW. Works out to be low cost over time.
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  #9  
Old 10-24-2011, 09:08 PM
rasorinc rasorinc is online now
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Maybe you could utilize just one 671 engine. Some here might suggest a way to use one without centering it. That would save you a lot of work and save you a lot of weight and you would have a spare for the future.
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  #10  
Old 10-24-2011, 09:20 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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Thats how that boat came originally. But the Coast Guard changed to twin for multiple reasons. That boat cost 52K when it was new in 1958.

As for buying new. I could see that. I went down in 09 to buy a new 21' aluminum boat. It was 42K with main and kicker and thats it. Even 42K is doable this close to retirement. But! A boat large enough to do what we want will be in excess of 150K new. I wont do that to my plans.
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  #11  
Old 10-24-2011, 09:37 PM
rasorinc rasorinc is online now
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If it is a displacement hull, twin engines do not gain you much extra speed, the hull design prevents that. You just waste fuel. I cannot tell by the pics what hull type it is.
But for retirement a single engine is the way to go with a hi thrust kicker engine for emergencies sized for the weight of the boat. Others will chime in soon, I'm sure.
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  #12  
Old 10-24-2011, 09:41 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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A kicker on a 40"? I do have a couple of Merc 115hp out back. It is a displacment hull though.
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  #13  
Old 10-24-2011, 10:05 PM
rasorinc rasorinc is online now
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When I lived at Seal Rock 25 miles north of Florence I saw a real heavy 30' fishing boat go up river north of me against current with a 9.9 hi thrust Yamaha. GO DUCKS.............................
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  #14  
Old 10-24-2011, 10:15 PM
crowsridge crowsridge is offline
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That works. I was thinking about a 25 would probably do. If that 9.9 did that well? Less weight and money.....
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  #15  
Old 10-24-2011, 10:48 PM
cyclops2 cyclops2 is offline
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My friend has a 18' Dagger Board sailboat with a small ? 5 or 6 hp & runs all the time in wind & current.
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