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  #1  
Old 06-16-2015, 03:18 PM
Standpipe Standpipe is offline
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Caught in a storm- what hull design? 30-35'

If you were caught in a dangerous storm, what type of hull/design/make would you want to be on?

Downeast? West coast troller? Steel trawler? Alumimun skiff (Alaska).

Hypothetical assumes a capable captain/crew.
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2015, 03:51 PM
TANSL TANSL is offline
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I do not know exactly what you want to investigate. My answer, without knowing anything more about his motives is : in a submarine in good state, with a good captain, a trained crew, no holes on hull, .....
I'm not kidding, what happens is that your question as it is posed, it seems not easy to answer.
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Old 06-16-2015, 07:14 PM
Jamie Kennedy Jamie Kennedy is offline
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If I was to pick one I the 30-35 foot range from this page here, just for fun...
http://www.benford.us/lists.html

I think I would go with the St.Pierre Power Dory, but in steel not plywood.
http://www.benford.us/pdf/FishingVessels.pdf
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  #4  
Old 06-16-2015, 09:49 PM
Standpipe Standpipe is offline
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Thanks guys...

Maybe I should rethink my question.

I wondered if a scientific study had been done of "fishing hulls", past and present. With the advent of computer programs that accurately describe sea states one could put "to the test" all fishing hull forms.
======================================================================
Example - Downeast

Some tried and true designs such as the Downeast lobster boat have weaknesses. According to one professional charter boat captain (Henriques and others) said the downeast boat was a handful in a following sea. In a head sea - there was no equal.
===========================================================================

No boat is perfect in all things and in all types of sea states but I wondered if NA's of today cobbled together the best "compromise" by using computer programs.
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Old 06-16-2015, 09:58 PM
Standpipe Standpipe is offline
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Thanks guys...

Maybe I should rethink my question.

I wondered if a scientific study had been done of "fishing hulls", past and present. With the advent of computer programs that accurately describe sea states one could put "to the test" all fishing hull forms.

Example - Downeast

Some tried and true designs such as the Downeast lobster boat have weaknesses. According to one professional charter boat captain (Henriques and others) said the downeast boat was a handful in a following sea. In a head sea - there was no equal.

No boat is perfect in all things and in all types of sea states but I wondered if NA's of today cobbled together the best "compromise" by using computer programs.
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Old 06-16-2015, 10:21 PM
Jamie Kennedy Jamie Kennedy is offline
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Still not clear if the boat needs to be able to perform certain tasks in addition to surviving a storm. Does it need to be capable of lobster fishing in particular, or all of the tasks that lobster boat are used for? What load conditions does it need to be in when it gets caught in the storm? Does it need to have some capability of attempting to head to safety before being caught in the storm? Is it a fishing boat type converted for cruising, or is it a fishing boat type used for the fisheries it was designed for? If a fishing boat type used for cruising I will stick with a steel St. Pierre dory type, with the classic banks dory hullform but with ballast to keep the CG low despite the cabins and pilothouse. Rather like a dory hulled lifeboat really. Good question about the software though. That would be the way to start the dory versus lobster boat etc.
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Old 06-16-2015, 10:33 PM
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PAR PAR is offline
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Yeah, these kind of questions are simply way too broad, even with a slight refinement of the hull type, to answer with any accuracy.

Simply put, most any ocean going hull, with sound skipper and crew will fair well in a storm. Even a less that ideal hull form will come through, mostly because seamanship is more man than ship. This assumes you mean a storm, not survival conditions, which is a whole different ball of wax. Much less than a Nimitz class and you're in deep doo doo in these sea states and if the hull form is less than desirable, you better hope it's the luckiest damn ship going, because this is often the only thing you have going for you.

Maybe it would be best to simply tell us what you're trying to figure out. You have a hull in mind and want to know what?
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Old 06-17-2015, 01:00 AM
Mr Efficiency Mr Efficiency is offline
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30-35 footer in dangerous storm, I'd say one anchored up a mangrove creek somewhere, but even that can get you into trouble, storm surge could see your boat perched on top of the trees, when the storm abates. Happened recently in this neck of the woods.
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  #9  
Old 06-17-2015, 01:47 AM
Ad Hoc Ad Hoc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Standpipe View Post
I wondered if a scientific study had been done of "fishing hulls", past and present.....
Yup. Plenty

Here is are just two of many:
Attached Files
File Type: pdf research_report_557 suitability stab FV.pdf (1.32 MB, 141 views)
File Type: pdf Deakin paper on fishing boats.pdf (348.5 KB, 121 views)
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  #10  
Old 06-17-2015, 05:10 AM
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PAR PAR is offline
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Generally speaking, commercial fishing boats place load capacity and primary operation tasks well up on the priority list, in the early stages of the design. The hull form will be burdensome and thus less desirable in a hefty storm, than other types, but this is one of the trade offs that are made, to bring home enough seafood to permit the vessel to pay it's way. Don't get me wrong, it's not going to be intentionally designed to be incapable, just less so than more purpose built craft.
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Old 06-17-2015, 05:43 AM
TANSL TANSL is offline
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All vessels, without exception, are designed to meet best their mission. This is the main factor to be taken into account. When you say that the mission of the boat is very well resist storms, we must design her to meet this objective. And, as in any other case, forms will be conditioned by this mission.
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Old 06-18-2015, 09:04 AM
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Easy Rider Easy Rider is offline
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"If you were caught in a dangerous storm, what type of hull/design/make would you want to be on?
Downeast? West coast troller? Steel trawler? Alumimun skiff (Alaska)."

I would not hesitate to choose the west coast troller or steel trawler if it was full displacement.

Another thought is to emulate a lifeboat that is (loosely speaking) designed to do that.

I think my own Willard 30 would do well if it weren't for the plastic windows.
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Old 06-18-2015, 12:42 PM
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PAR PAR is offline
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I wouldn't want to be in a lifeboat hull form in a storm. These are designed to survive, but they'll roll and buck the whole way. You'll be puking in no time, though she'll probably come through, relatively unharmed, the crew will suffer.
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Old 06-19-2015, 08:40 AM
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Easy Rider Easy Rider is offline
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Indeed PAR. The OP did say "want to be on".
Said nothing about surviving.
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  #15  
Old 06-19-2015, 03:14 PM
yam_fzr yam_fzr is offline
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A wide beam cat.
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