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  #16  
Old 01-02-2017, 04:21 AM
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Corley Corley is offline
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A new record looks set to be established between Cape of Good Hope and Cape Leeuwin with an average speed of over 36 knots.

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/an-...euwin/?lang=en
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2017, 09:20 PM
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Some pretty remarkable records have been set by the IDEC team.

Ushant Australia in just 17 days, 6 hours and 59 minutes

The Indian Ocean in 4 days and 9 hours averaging more than 35 knots

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/two...euwin/?lang=en
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2017, 12:52 PM
Ilan Voyager Ilan Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corley View Post
Some pretty remarkable records have been set by the IDEC team.

Ushant Australia in just 17 days, 6 hours and 59 minutes

The Indian Ocean in 4 days and 9 hours averaging more than 35 knots

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/two...euwin/?lang=en
Thanks for all the information. These machines are now beasts of beasts. Not seems to interest many people in the forum...Corley, have you remarked that there not one motor boat or ship able in the world to maintain such speeds over so long distances? You try that with a fast frigate and the engines will melt down just before running out of fuel somewhere in the Indian Ocean.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:45 PM
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I tend to think a fair few people pop in to look at the updates even if they don't comment. I was doubtful about the smaller rig on the boat but who knows maybe it's spot on hard to argue with that many successive days with an average of 36 knots. As always they are going to have to keep their lead through the return trip in the South and North Atlantic where most records seem to slip away. All the signs are good for now they have managed to pull out a lead of over 1000nm and maintained a much more Southerly track than the BPV team with a far superior VMG.

A nice article by Brian Hancock over at Sailfeed:

http://www.sailfeed.com/2017/01/idec...outhern-ocean/
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2017, 06:05 PM
redreuben redreuben is offline
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It's pretty mind bending stuff, I hope there is some real feedback into hull and rig management for the ordinary folk !
One thing about Bank Pop though, way better video !
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  #21  
Old 01-04-2017, 02:11 AM
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The records continue to tumble with the Ushant to Tasmania record lowered to 18 days, 18 hours and 31 minutes down from 20 days, 4 hours and 37 minutes set by BPV.

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/new...mania/?lang=en
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2017, 07:15 AM
lucdekeyser lucdekeyser is offline
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look ahead

Do they have some instrument to look ahead for almost fully submerged flotsam to avoid crashing into? IR based at night?
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2017, 11:35 AM
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Idec

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corley View Post
A new record looks set to be established between Cape of Good Hope and Cape Leeuwin with an average speed of over 36 knots.

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/an-...euwin/?lang=en
===================
Incredible!
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2017, 11:38 AM
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Do they have some instrument to look ahead for almost fully submerged flotsam to avoid crashing into? IR based at night?
=====================
There is some development in sonar that can "see" containers just below the surface but it won't work(so far) at the speeds of and in the sea states encountered by IDEC or even of the Vendee boats. But technology is moving very quickly....
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2017, 01:25 AM
Ilan Voyager Ilan Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corley View Post
I tend to think a fair few people pop in to look at the updates even if they don't comment. I was doubtful about the smaller rig on the boat but who knows maybe it's spot on hard to argue with that many successive days with an average of 36 knots. As always they are going to have to keep their lead through the return trip in the South and North Atlantic where most records seem to slip away. All the signs are good for now they have managed to pull out a lead of over 1000nm and maintained a much more Southerly track than the BPV team with a far superior VMG.

A nice article by Brian Hancock over at Sailfeed:

http://www.sailfeed.com/2017/01/idec...outhern-ocean/
I was one of the few who thought that the small rig was an excellent idea. You have to analyse the parts of the circumnavigation. With a big rig in all the south part the tri is overpowered.
A big rig has numerous parasitic effects, lots of windage, weight placed high thus less stability, time lost in reefing, and often you have to depower the main sail by twisting the upper part.
In a regatta you need all the poneys and you can take risks, in low wind zones you need some cloth on the mast. But the strategy of a circumnavigation over 45 days is pretty different; it's preferable to get better mean speeds by being "smooth" and easy.
The tri suffers less and make the diagrams of the vectors, the center of the sails is lower -it's an evidence- but also you can use sails very slightly fuller, a bit more powerful by square meter with maybe one degree better orientation.
The degree forward is nothing in a regatta, useless un a zone without wind, but in a zone with lots of wind, with strong seas, over thousands of miles, you have made the good choice. The amas have less pressure, the drag is less, the amount of power is practically the same but slightly better oriented...That the analysis I made when Joyon talked about the small rig.
Now you have to balance the gains in high winds and the losses in low wind zones. One strategy is to have bigger gennakers, and also if possible a "square" mainsail. The other is to navigate a bit closer to the wind, and optimize the ratio speed/distance, the good ole VMG.
I learned that when the boats of the formula 40 were sold very cheaply after the death of the formula 40 around 1991. The cats with the high masts were frankly dangerous specially for amateurs, but with "small" rigs they became sweet babies with a very interesting thing, the obtainable mean speeds on 50 miles were better; less mistakes, no scary situations, less spray.
With the right conditions 20 knots of mean speed on 100 miles was not an exploit, any guy able to sail cleanly a Tornado was able to do it without being at the verge of the catastrophe. For sure in a 5 knots wind you were crying for the big mast, but with a 25 knots wind you were making miles over miles safely with speed.
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  #26  
Old 01-05-2017, 02:47 PM
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It looks like Didac Costa is about to have some company.
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  #27  
Old 01-06-2017, 09:06 PM
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The IDEC team have transitioned to another weather system and are currently at 32 knots and 904nm ahead of the BPV reference position. Banque Populaire suffered a few slow days (in relative terms) in the same area so the potential to make up time is there. The IDEC teams latest press release is here:

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/att...south/?lang=en
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  #28  
Old 01-07-2017, 04:04 PM
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Conditions are favorable for the IDEC team and they are making excellent progress towards Cape Horn:

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/in-...ctica/?lang=en
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  #29  
Old 01-08-2017, 05:06 AM
semelis semelis is offline
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They are 3 days ahead of L.P. BP5, at least as eastward reference goes, and could be 4 by the time they get to Cape Horn if everything goes well.
But in last year attempt, from the Horn to Ouessant, Yann Guichard lost 2d and 15 hours and Joyon lost 2d minus 2 hours.
Despite the big turn Lock had to do around the Azores high !
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  #30  
Old 01-08-2017, 04:50 PM
Ilan Voyager Ilan Voyager is offline
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Corley, many thanks for all the work in the thread. We'll see in a few days if the option small rig was a good one...The first part of the analysis about the rig by Joyon has right.
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