Boat Design Forums  |  Boat Design Directory  |  Boat Design Gallery  |  Boat Design Book Store  |  Thanks to Our Site Sponsors
  #136  
Old 11-03-2011, 06:17 AM
oldsailor7's Avatar
oldsailor7 oldsailor7 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Rep: 436 Posts: 2,097
Location: Sydney Australia


Here is a pic of the wire which holds up the outer edges of the wing nets.
Please note it attaches to the bolt holding the wrapper plate fitting. If there is no wrapper plate strap then the assembly was not correctly built in the first place. The purpose of the wrapper strap is to transfer the load from the waterstay directly to the flat strap which connects it to the tube, via the thru bolt. IF it is not there, the flat strap will try to bend downwards and bear on the wood of the crossbeam supports which will eventually become worn down and fail. This is what happened to Bruce's B24 which has the same system, but whoever built it thought the wrapper strap fitting was un-necessary, and didn't incorporate it.





Float under construction. Note the "Strongback is simply 2 x 4s fastened to the flat and level concrete floor. Legs formed by extensions of the frame side pieces hold up the frames to allow first the keel and then the side stringers and gunnels to be fitted. Once beveled the ply skins can then be
attached. As per the building instructions.





Here is the same float. Note the laminated and beveled stem.





Here is the main hull on the strongback.
Note the cabin structure is all built at the same time. You can't actually spot it, but the supporting members for the interior are also installed at this time.





The cabin top.
Note the organic and pleasing shape of the windows as Crowther originally designed them.

~
Reply With Quote
  #137  
Old 11-03-2011, 09:48 AM
bruceb bruceb is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Rep: 214 Posts: 1,134
Location: atlanta,ga
tramp and straps

OS is correct, the straps are important. Mine were left off at some point and have continued to cause issues. I will be fixing them this winter. I used dyneema instead of wire for the tramp edges this season and am very satisfied, it is easy to splice to size and I did not notice any stretch after they were first tightened. Great stuff
Toofar, I used plastic float hatches last year when I rebuilt my float decks. I don't trust water sealing with light home built float hatches and metal framed ones are both heavy and very expensive. The float decks can be exposed to a LOT of fast moving water so the hatches have to be really tight. I am happy with the plastic Beckson, not so much with the plastimo. I recessed both a little to provide a somewhat protected and flat mounting area. I will get some pics up soon- I just finished pulling my boat out for the winter.
Those are nice 28 pics OS!! Thanks. B
Reply With Quote
  #138  
Old 11-03-2011, 04:44 PM
oldsailor7's Avatar
oldsailor7 oldsailor7 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Rep: 436 Posts: 2,097
Location: Sydney Australia
Bruce is right. Dyneema is ideal for that purpose.
Unfortunately it didn't exist when we built our 28s.
Reply With Quote
  #139  
Old 11-03-2011, 05:09 PM
oldsailor7's Avatar
oldsailor7 oldsailor7 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Rep: 436 Posts: 2,097
Location: Sydney Australia
In that last pic, note the cradles supporting the hulls.
They are simply made from 5/8" ply cut out using the frame patterns suitably widened to allow for the thickness of the hull skins and padding. They support the hulls at frames 4 and 7. The padding is 5/8" PVC foam bonded to the edges of the ply with fillets of resin and phenolic microballoons. The supports are ordinary 2 X 4s. Cheap, easy and very effective. When the boat is finished they can be used to store the boat on land after haul out, during winter etc:
Reply With Quote
  #140  
Old 11-04-2011, 06:58 AM
farjoe farjoe is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Rep: 26 Posts: 156
Location: med
@OS7

re the first picture above, it seems that, between the wrapper strap, the flat strap for the waterstay( which seems to run all the way across the hull) and the beam strap itself, there is a lot of stainless steel directly in contact with aluminium in a very critical area of the beam. Is this healthy?
Reply With Quote
  #141  
Old 11-04-2011, 08:19 PM
oldsailor7's Avatar
oldsailor7 oldsailor7 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Rep: 436 Posts: 2,097
Location: Sydney Australia
I never had any problem with it.
But then all my alloy tubing was triple anodised, which I would highly recommend.The tube section is round and the strap is flat, so the contact area is very small. A coat of epoxy ---or even "Goop", on the feying surfaces
would give protection. Crowther says to use Thiocol between all metal surfaces. But I don't know where you would get it.
Reply With Quote
  #142  
Old 11-04-2011, 09:55 PM
Angélique's Avatar
Angélique Angélique is offline
aka Angel (only by name)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Rep: 1632 Posts: 1,383
Location: Belgium
It's not only the straight straps for the waterstays that have contact but also the clamps arround the beams.

Looking at Thiokol and this site he might have meant something like these polyurethane axle bushings . . ? ?



Cheers,
Angel
Reply With Quote
  #143  
Old 11-04-2011, 10:12 PM
Angélique's Avatar
Angélique Angélique is offline
aka Angel (only by name)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Rep: 1632 Posts: 1,383
Location: Belgium
Ah... found a lot of Thiokol in Russia . . . . .

- - - -

Hope they take worldwide orders . . . .

Good luck!
Angel
Reply With Quote
  #144  
Old 11-04-2011, 10:41 PM
Angélique's Avatar
Angélique Angélique is offline
aka Angel (only by name)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Rep: 1632 Posts: 1,383
Location: Belgium
This one claims to be global.
Quote:
THIOKOL® LP Liquid Polysulfide Polymer

Compounds based on THIOKOL® LP polysulfide polymer form flexible and highly durable elastic rubber compounds that exhibit outstanding oil and chemical-resistance and weatherproofing, as well as airtight and watertight properties. Thanks to these advantages it is used as a sealant in building and civil engineering applications, insulated glass and aircraft fuel tanks, and as a raw material polymer for various industrial products. In addition to these THIOKOL® LP advantages, THIOKOL® LP-282 is earning a good reputation as a raw material polymer for its response to dynamic durability, easy coating and availability in many colors. THIOKOL® LP is manufactured and marketed by Toray Fine Chemicals Co., Ltd.

And here a serie, also claims to be global.
Quote:
Polysulfide liquid polymer - Introduction:

SPI Supplies now offers the entire line of LP polymers from Morton Thiokol. If you don't see what you are looking for and if the product is listed in "black", it means only that it is not yet up on the website. Contract us for pricing. Be sure to give us the product number and the quantity needed. Less than 5 gallon quantities have been repackaged by SPI Supplies.

LP polymers are synthetic rubber resins used in the production of a wide range of end products including

• sealants for aerospace, construction and insulated glass industries
• coatings and membranes
• formed in-place gaskets
• impregnation of leather
• wire and cable sealing
• vibration dampening
• dental molding compounds
• electrical potting compounds and plastic tooling
• printing blankets
• component in embedding resins used in microscopy and histology embedding

Good luck!
Angel
Reply With Quote
  #145  
Old 11-04-2011, 11:21 PM
Angélique's Avatar
Angélique Angélique is offline
aka Angel (only by name)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Rep: 1632 Posts: 1,383
Location: Belgium
Btw, google "liquid polysulfide polymer" brings up more suppliers and info for Thiokol.
Reply With Quote
  #146  
Old 11-05-2011, 10:27 AM
bruceb bruceb is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Rep: 214 Posts: 1,134
Location: atlanta,ga
polysulfide

In the US, "Life Caulk" from Life Seal is the most common polysulfide brand available. Just don't use it on anything plastic.
On my Buc 24, which was in salt water for over 25 years, the damage between the stainless and aluminum was minimal, and was worse where the cross beams were in contact with the wood saddles. My beams are just painted, not anodized and as long as the coatings stayed intact, there is no damage at all. I am sure they are good for at least another 25 years- good enough for me. I do think that dismounting and inspecting a Buc every year or two should be considered as regular maintenance. These are lightly built high load machines exposed to really tuff conditions so some repair is to be expected. B
Reply With Quote
  #147  
Old 12-09-2011, 06:32 PM
oldsailor7's Avatar
oldsailor7 oldsailor7 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Rep: 436 Posts: 2,097
Location: Sydney Australia
Well we are not having any luck with the B28 plans,--- but I still have one set of Buccaneer 24 plans left. $150.00 shipped.
When they are gone there will be no more.
PM me if interested.
Reply With Quote
  #148  
Old 02-18-2012, 07:40 PM
Marcos Henrique Marcos Henrique is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Rep: 10 Posts: 10
Location: Brasil
I'm interested in getting a set of B28 plans.
Reply With Quote
  #149  
Old 03-05-2012, 09:31 PM
oldsailor7's Avatar
oldsailor7 oldsailor7 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Rep: 436 Posts: 2,097
Location: Sydney Australia
Lol Marcos.
So are we all.
Reply With Quote


  #150  
Old 05-29-2012, 11:23 PM
2far2drive 2far2drive is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Rep: 82 Posts: 116
Location: Houston, TX
Sorry for not posting for a long time... we have been on hiatus!

the ama is currently being constructed... all frames up and keel/stem lammed on in 4 days!

Buccaneer 28 Trimaran plans.-photo-0508.jpg

I hope you guys can see this album, I made the permissions all public. Please let me know if you have trouble viewing, you shouldnt need a facebook account.

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...1&l=8c4d36094e
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hedley Nicol Trimaran Plans oldsailor7 Multihulls 456 01-17-2017
07:29 AM 
Buccaneer 24 Trimaran Samnz Multihulls 573 09-08-2015
12:37 PM 
RE: A look-for trimaran plans Liturl_Ellyrod Multihulls 8 02-05-2010
11:43 PM 
Farrier Trimaran Plans - F-9A or F-32 PedalPaddlePole Marketplace 3 01-18-2007
05:37 PM 
Trimaran Construction Plans PedalPaddlePole Marketplace 0 11-03-2006
09:35 PM 

Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:32 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Web Site Design and Content Copyright ©1999 - 2017 Boat Design Net