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  #1  
Old 08-04-2010, 04:48 PM
USRower USRower is offline
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Yacht Design School?

I am interested in getting a degree in Naval Architecture but travel around with the US Rowing team and am unable to stay in one place for extended periods of time due to regattas over seas and training camps. I have an interest in design and engineering with hopes to be able to work on boats, yachts, and ships at a boat/shipyard once my rowing is completed.

Being that I am located in an area (San Diego) that (to my knowledge) does not have a Naval Architecture school nearby, I looked for online schools and found the "Yacht Design School"offered by the MacNaughton Group of Eastport, ME.

I wanted to ask you all and see if anyone has any understanding or is aware of their credibility for producing acceptable degrees.

It seems that enrolling in their course I'd be able to study while also train and race in rowing events around the world. However, if any of you have advice as to how I may be able to study this discipline remotely, I would greatly appreciate it! Thanks a ton!
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2010, 01:27 AM
DavidJ DavidJ is offline
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There has been lots of discussion about that school in these forums. Use the search tool to check the education forum for YDS or yacht design school. You could also look into Westlawn and the many discussions about it as well.
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  #3  
Old 08-05-2010, 01:42 AM
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Alik Alik is offline
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Westlawn and MacNaughton do not give any degree, to tell the truth. I also wonder if there is any naval architect (with degree) teaching there
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Old 08-05-2010, 09:35 PM
Michael Chudy Michael Chudy is offline
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I can say with certanty that the head instructor at YDS has no NA degree. Tom was a student of Brewer at YDI for a period, then went out on his own. He calls himself a Naval Architect, and in Maine that is OK - you can do whatever you want.
Michael

Last edited by Michael Chudy : 08-05-2010 at 09:36 PM. Reason: misspelling
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Old 08-05-2010, 10:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Michael Chudy View Post
I can say with certanty that the head instructor at YDS has no NA degree. Tom was a student of Brewer at YDI for a period, then went out on his own. He calls himself a Naval Architect, and in Maine that is OK - you can do whatever you want.
Michael
I think legally those people can't call themselves 'naval architect' as it assumes at least bachelor degree. NA degree is associated with much wider knowledge of different kind of ships, ship theory and hydrodynamics, structural engineering, industry standards, etc. that can not be compared with knowledge required in limited area of boat design. Calling themselves 'boat designers' is more fair.
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Old 08-06-2010, 02:05 AM
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Willallison Willallison is offline
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Actually, according to the Royal Institute of Naval Architects, there are no formal educational requirements for calling ones self an NA.
Of course, in order to be recognised by them and other proffessional bodies, one does have to be qualified. Graduation from Westlawn is indeed one such qualification.
Westlawn, of course, does not cover the same ground as other educational programs - it is focussed on 'small-craft' design - it doesn't cover ships, oil rigs etc
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Old 08-06-2010, 03:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Willallison View Post
Actually, according to the Royal Institute of Naval Architects, there are no formal educational requirements for calling ones self an NA.
In some countries there are.

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Of course, in order to be recognised by them and other proffessional bodies, one does have to be qualified. Graduation from Westlawn is indeed one such qualification.
It is definitely NOT, though the diploma will be accepted in boat design industry it is not valid to work as naval architect. If one reads the curriculum of Westawn, can note that important components of NA education are missing there: say controllability course and ship motions course are missing, structural design and performance prediction are taught in simplified style, etc. There are no other disciplines like maths, chemistry, physics, programming, machine design, strength of materials, economics, etc.that are must know items for NAs as engineering specialists. I studied myself and later was teaching naval architects for years, believe me there is a BIG difference.

Besides Westlawn course is correspondence without face-to-face exam. Right title for Westlawn graduate is 'boat designer', not naval architect.
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Old 08-06-2010, 07:51 AM
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Willallison Willallison is offline
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I have no argument with you regarding the differences between the Westlawn course and a traditional NA degree. As I said, the former is aimed at small-craft craft design and does not attempt to cover a great deal of the engineering etc that other courses do.
However, I can assure you that it IS -quite rightly IMHO - recognised by RINA.
Having said that, and as a Westlawn grad, I feel more comfortable with the title yacht designer than NA.... for the very reasons that both you and I have listed.
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Old 08-06-2010, 08:01 AM
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Will, I studied in Westlawn myself but didn't complete; some of my staff did also I would say their course is aimed at pleasure yacht design for US market; as far as I know till now they do not give essential issues on ISO Small Craft that is 'a must' for boat designer today.
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Old 08-06-2010, 09:11 AM
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Willallison Willallison is offline
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Yes - in that we are in complete agreement! There are aspects of the course - just like any other - that are in need of updating. And to be fair, they have been in the process of doing that for some time...
The lack of education regarding standards is a very good example....
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Old 08-06-2010, 02:53 PM
USRower USRower is offline
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Will and Alek,
Thank you for your conversation as it has been most enlightening. It sounds like you have had your experiences at Westlawn and they have seemed to have been successful for you. Have you had any desire to acquire a masters degree from an institution that may be able to give you the "proper" title as a Naval Architect?

I figured I would learn the programs through YDS and/or Westlawn, get some work experience in San Diego (or the Boston/Newport R.I. area if I am there) and then try to get into a university masters program. I already have a BA from Cal Berkeley. . . I guess that brings up another thought. . . would it be worth going back to undergrad and getting a BS in Naval Architecture?

How is business going with you guys in small boat/ yacht designing? Do you enjoy it?

Elliot
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Old 08-06-2010, 02:55 PM
USRower USRower is offline
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. . . sorry for the multiple post. . . airport wifi is pretty weak!
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  #13  
Old 08-06-2010, 03:58 PM
Paul Kotzebue Paul Kotzebue is offline
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Will and Alek,
I figured I would learn the programs through YDS and/or Westlawn, get some work experience in San Diego (or the Boston/Newport R.I. area if I am there) and then try to get into a university masters program.
If you want to get any meaningful work experience in San Diego you should have a degree in naval architecture, mechanical engineering, or civil engineering.
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Old 08-06-2010, 07:05 PM
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Will and Alek,
Have you had any desire to acquire a masters degree from an institution that may be able to give you the "proper" title as a Naval Architect?
I have Specialist degree (5 years of University study) in NA, and Ph.D. in Ship Dynamics...

Quote:
How is business going with you guys in small boat/ yacht designing? Do you enjoy it?
To be successful in this business, You have to do different things. Almost no one can survive designing sailboats only; and sometimes we have to design workboats and fishing boats, especially in crisis times... This means we should know more than just yacht designer needs.
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  #15  
Old 08-06-2010, 09:22 PM
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Willallison Willallison is offline
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I am in the (fortunate?) position that yacht design is not my sole source of income, so I am able to to pick and choose to some extent what work I do. Further, much of it is for myself - whether commercially or just for interests sake.
If I were a younger man, just starting out with a view to working full time in the design industry, I too would take a 'more formal' education in naval architecture. Westlawn is a worthwhile experience and can certainly be a good way of entering the marione design industry - there are plenty of succesfull Westlawn alumni that can attest to that. It really depends which sector of the industry you want to work in and in what capacity. As Alike rightly points out however, in difficult times, one can't always be too choosy....
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