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  #1  
Old 09-18-2011, 07:09 AM
Bakunsoy Bakunsoy is offline
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Naval Architecture Schools

I am on my second year in mechanical engineering in the Philippines. I would like to pursue a career in Naval Architecture. I have conditional offers from University of New South Wales and Newcastle University, UK. It is also probable that I'd get the same from Australian Maritime College and University of Southampton. I would like to get some feedbacks from anybody who can compare these schools. Is there any advantage if I get the degree in UK rather than in Australia?

Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 09-19-2011, 04:33 AM
NavArchJames NavArchJames is offline
 
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AMC is way better than University of New South Wales
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  #3  
Old 09-19-2011, 09:51 PM
RThompson RThompson is offline
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AMC would be preferable over UNSW due to its facilities, maritime focus, staff/student ratios, the combined maritime business and engineering experience of the staff there, and so on... For Naval Architecture or marine engineering in this part of the world I think its hard to surpass AMC.

Also, Tasmania is much cheaper to live in than Sydney.

An advantage of UK naval architecture over this part of the world might be the sheer size of the industry over there. Whether that has much impact on quality of education I dont know. I considered studying in the UK but chose AMC; in retrospect I cant really see much difference in the outcome -the fundamental lessons are the same.
Rob
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  #4  
Old 09-19-2011, 09:57 PM
Ad Hoc Ad Hoc is offline
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Southampton & Newcastle are both excellent and world renowned Universities for naval architect. Southampton was actually listed as the 87th (I think from memory) best uni in the world; so good alround too. I don’t know enough about the Aussie ones except ex-work colleagues (who studied there) were more big ship/military, but that was many years ago now.

I went to Southampton…and can recommend it.
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  #5  
Old 09-20-2011, 11:44 PM
Bakunsoy Bakunsoy is offline
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Thank you very much for your replies. It seems UNSW is no longer in the run. This will be a toss up between UK and AMC. I hope to narrow it down when offers from those institutions are in.
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  #6  
Old 09-21-2011, 12:34 AM
RThompson RThompson is offline
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Yes, AMC does have a background in commercial shipping and military, Although not necessarily 'big' ships (funnily enough I had always associated, for no particular reason, big ships with Uni Newcastle).
I think AMC studies could be characterised by, say, 20 to 100m commercial vessels (fishing boats, ferries, crew boats, OPVs, survey vessels etc). Having said that there is significant and current staff experience with sailling yacht research and design. There is very little time spent on aesthetics, interior design (beyond vessel motions and ergonomics), or other 'yacht design' subjects.
The AMC degree is very much an engineering degree first and foremost. Lots of maths, hydrodynamics/statics, and structures. Those fundamental lessons I imagine are the same across all the uni's you mentioned. Although I have no experience with them I dont think you would go wrong with any of them.

Good luck!
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  #7  
Old 09-23-2011, 08:31 AM
cracker cracker is offline
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Dear Bakunsoy

I hope you get a wider voice of opinion than just on here. Have you tried LinkedIn?

A few things to remember. It is much easier to get into AMC than UNSW. UNSW were producing naval architects (including the founder of wave piercers, Phil Hercus) for decades before AMC opened its course. AMC has been offering naval architecture for about 10 years, which is enough time for them to be doing it well, and I am not saying that they don't.

I have worked with graduates of both, including a good friend that went to AMC.

If you look at the ranking tables, UNSW is in the Top 50 Worldwide Good Universities Guide.

Also

The UNSW Faculty of Engineering is the largest Engineering School in Australia, with over 7,500 students enrolled.

I agree with the UK having more NA companies, as far as employment goes, you might also like to consider that more principal naval architects in Australia are likely to be UNSW alumni.

Good luck, graduating from any of them and getting a good first job or two is what will set your career up. Do you know what particular part/s of naval architecture you are interested in. (not always relevant, I love sailing, but there is not enough client base to warrant being solely a yacht designer)
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  #8  
Old 09-25-2011, 10:20 PM
RThompson RThompson is offline
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Cracker makes some good points re UNSW, there is also the fact that AMC is basically land-locked - UNSW has a lot more going for it in that regard (sailing, fishing, ferries, merchant/military navy and so on).
I should have said my preference was AMC due to the points outlined above. Certainly I would prefer to be in a lecture of 20 students with a lecturer I can go talk to anytime rather than 200 or more with a lecturer I may never actually meet (edit -that comment is not directed at any uni in particular, but rather highlighting something I liked about AMC).
Rob
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  #9  
Old 09-26-2011, 05:53 AM
cracker cracker is offline
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I agree with Rob, it was better to have lecturers more available. Having been accepted into UNSW, I choose to complete Years 1 & 2 and the local Uni (which had a great engineering reputation, but was much smaller than UNSW).
The NA subjects are not the hardest, it seemed to be the other engineering subjects that caused most of the people that didn't graduate the most trouble.
Sailing on Sydney Harbour is awesome
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  #10  
Old 09-26-2011, 07:29 AM
Bakunsoy Bakunsoy is offline
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Dear RThomson and cracker

I appreciate your posts very much. I agree with almost everything you say. UNSW is a very good school not only in engineering. Engineeringwise it is ranked much higher than Southampton and UTas.

I have asked some of the local naval architects as well as in other fora about the NA programs of the schools I mentioned, it all appeared that UNSW is the weakest (I hope this the right word to describe it) in Naval Architecture. While it is really strong in engineering foundation, some of the modules are missing in preparing a newly graduate in his first job. The NA modules seem to be too few. Cracker, please comment on this. Thanks in advance.

RThomson is right in saying that AMC has a maritime focus.
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  #11  
Old 09-26-2011, 08:50 PM
cracker cracker is offline
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Yes, AMC has more marine subjects, earlier. Uni is about teaching fundamental, underpinning knowledge as well as preparing graduates for first job.

You have yet to tell us what sort of naval architect you wish to become. It is OK if you do not know, but say that.

Perhaps take a look at the Thesis topics offered by both. I had Phil Helmore as my Thesis supervisor, he was great and is the best lecturer in UNSW (and consistently gets very high student rating scores). I would recommend Phil as a Thesis supervisor to anyone.
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  #12  
Old 09-27-2011, 11:05 PM
Bakunsoy Bakunsoy is offline
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I would be most likely into ship design or shipmanagement. But yacht or small boats is in my heart too. It will all depends on my first job upon graduation. Then I would build a career around it.
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  #13  
Old 09-28-2011, 07:11 PM
RThompson RThompson is offline
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If you have a penchant for ship management then again AMC can help in this part of the world: (http://www.amc.edu.au/maritime-and-logistics-management).

WRT your comment: "I would be most likely into ship design or shipmanagement. But yacht or small boats is in my heart too."

It seems that 'ship design' and management will translate to the yacht or small boat industry rather well, but small boat design and management does not translate to 'ship design' so easily. IE With respect to engineering - learn to design ships and small boat design will come with the territory, learn to design small boats and big ships will require a bit more effort. Although it must be said, again, the fundamental hydrostatics/dynamics and structures is the same. (except that ships use mostly steel and small boats also use other materials)

I suspect that a 'commercial ship' engineering degree will get more credit in the wider maritime industry than a 'smaller boat/yacht' engineering degree. (I expect someone will vigorously challenge that comment...) ie if one even mentions the words 'small craft' or 'yacht' in conversation with heavy commercial maritime people then either the price doubles (if your buying) or credibility as 'real' engineering is questioned (if your selling) - that is unless they are actually involved in design and construction of small craft or if they can comprehend (in technical terms) what you are actually saying. There is a whole world of hurt in debating whether or not this prejudice is justified. Of course the corollary to that is from within yachting there seems to be less respect for heavy/commercial industry knowledge and qualifications. In terms of finding money and work I know on which side of the fence the grass is greener.

Generally there is more maritime engineering work (and money) available on the commercial side of things: oil and gas, merchant navy, ferries etc etc.
Its likely that a design team would prefer a degree aimed at whatever they specialise in. Although if the candidate is a new entrant, any potential employer may be more interested in your general aptitude etc, as they will be assuming they will have to teach you what you need to know to be productive in their system-so long as you have a recognised engineering degree.

Maybe I read to much into it all -at the end of the day either its a recognised engineering degree or it is not. This is about getting the first job, after that its really up to you how well you go regardless of where your degree came from.


Rob
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  #14  
Old 09-28-2011, 10:05 PM
Bakunsoy Bakunsoy is offline
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Thank you, Rob. You seem to understand it well....
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