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  #76  
Old 12-01-2011, 07:21 PM
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viking north viking north is offline
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No, at 5 to 6 ton loaded it is strickly a marine railroad set up. I live on the water, have my own wharf and launch ramp and have railroad track and a winch which will be installed before the boat is ready. The area where we live is one of the best boating in this part of the province other than some foggy conditions usually up to the end of June. 72hrs. sail will get me to Newfoundland or Maine. We also own a B&B (www.anchorsgatebb.com ) with my woodworking/metalworking/welding workshop in the back yard. We are reducing the activity of both buisnesses especially my shop. If you checkout the B&B site it will give you some idea of the long narrow inland bay (3 miles to the open ocean) we live on. My shop can handle a 36footer with 16ft. ceilings and doors for easy access. It's all becoming a hobby now. We're leaving for Florida end of Feb. in the land Yacht which we built two years ago. My sister and her husband live in and operate a trucking buisness near Daytona so it's very economical for us to park the rig and make short trips from there. By short trips I mean as far as the Keys
Regarding your road trailer, we just built one at the shop for a big power boat--tri axil--(the last one). For road work you need a tandum with brake. Gives you good stability and safety for long distance road work. We used mobile home axils and wheels on the triaxil. In your area shouldn't be a problem picking one up at a good price. A powerboat trailer can easily be converted for a keel boat. --
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  #77  
Old 12-01-2011, 07:52 PM
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Yobarnacle Yobarnacle is offline
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Very nice B&B. Very reasonable rates. Canadian$ or US$, reasonable either one. I have been to Halifax a couple times to pick up a tow and laid over a few days for weather, insurance required me to wait. Not been there recently though. Wonderfull town. Friendly folk. Bought some nice crystal at factory there.
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  #78  
Old 12-01-2011, 08:07 PM
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viking north viking north is offline
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That crystal factory was started and run by one of the Rhyans Fancy Boys (Dennis Ryan)a very popular Irish music group from the past. My father spent alot of time in the harbour during the war. As part of the merchant navy they had to wait at anchor while the convoys were formed up. Little did he know a son yet to be born would be living near and sailing on the same body of water. Small world--Well heading for the bunk--hard day today--continuing closing in the boat and working on the keel mold--more photos on the progress tomorrow. Will be happy when i get to the topic of this thread --The Galley -- Geo.
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  #79  
Old 12-02-2011, 12:24 AM
Boston Boston is offline
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nice place Geo
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  #80  
Old 12-02-2011, 05:12 AM
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Yobarnacle Yobarnacle is offline
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my reasons to buy

One reason I purchased the Albin 25 is Albins excellent reputation for quality FRP lay up and another is the wealth of information available for these boats. The designer, Per Brohal wasn't stingy with his drawings.
Attached Thumbnails
Where did we go wrong?-albin-25-lines.jpg  Where did we go wrong?-albin-25-stability.jpg  Where did we go wrong?-albin-25-sail-rig.jpg  

Where did we go wrong?-albin-25-plan.jpg  
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  #81  
Old 12-02-2011, 05:43 AM
FAST FRED FAST FRED is offline
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Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big dock & room for O'nite stop .
In Some areas of the Med a stern tie for ONE night for a 40 ft boat is $400.US

and dinner ashore is about $500.

SADLY ,That is not in my cruising budget . A galley is.
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  #82  
Old 12-02-2011, 05:45 AM
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Yobarnacle Yobarnacle is offline
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THANK the LORD, I ain't in the Med.
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  #83  
Old 12-02-2011, 06:31 AM
Joakim Joakim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FAST FRED View Post
In Some areas of the Med a stern tie for ONE night for a 40 ft boat is $400.US

and dinner ashore is about $500.

SADLY ,That is not in my cruising budget . A galley is.
Where would that be? E.g. here the fee would be about 1/10 of that: http://www.riviera-ports.com/Display....ascx&portId=1

Dinner $500/person? I have spent 100 sometimes, but hard to image how you could spent 500 and where would be a place you could not eat for under 30, if you wanted to.
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  #84  
Old 12-02-2011, 06:46 AM
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hoytedow hoytedow is offline
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Originally Posted by Tiny Turnip View Post
Ooh ...................


thin sliced raw undyed smoked haddock,
lime juice (to cook/oxidise the fish, but I don't leave it any longer than it takes to finish the dish, I prefer the more raw texture)
...................

<dribble>
A report came out recently that the recipe you describe (we call it ceviche) does not kill parasites in the flesh, exposing you to serious health issues. Soaking in citrus does not equal cooking in terms of sterilizing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceviche...l_health_risks
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  #85  
Old 12-02-2011, 07:01 AM
michael pierzga michael pierzga is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FAST FRED View Post
In Some areas of the Med a stern tie for ONE night for a 40 ft boat is $400.US

and dinner ashore is about $500.

SADLY ,That is not in my cruising budget . A galley is.

Big range in dockage fees in the Med. In my 'Hood high season dockage is 6 and a half Euro per sqaure meter per night. eye watering. In Greece, with a sharp eye you can still dock for free. Taverna Food ashore is resonable in most areas. Generally 100 euros for four hungry crew eating good stuff.
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  #86  
Old 12-02-2011, 07:07 AM
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Willallison Willallison is offline
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Ok... let's accept that some people untie their boats, potter off to the next marina and then go ashore for dinner. Why the hell you'd bother is beyond me - easier and cheaper to get in the car and then stay in a good hotel, but that's beside the point. But, let's put that aside... do you also eat ashore for breakfast. And again at morning tea time... then lunch, afternoon tea....
The more I think about it, the more I consider a boat without at least the bare essentials of a galley to be only half a boat...
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  #87  
Old 12-02-2011, 07:22 AM
michael pierzga michael pierzga is offline
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This depends Will. Generally I serve breakfast...fruit and coffee at 0800 then anchor up 0900. Most times lunch is on board...but its a simple affair with crew in swim suites...Im talking sandwiches and a salad.

In a normal day of sailing, I can push the boat hard enough to completely exhaust everyone onboard. Getting off the boat, stretching your legs, grabbing a newspaper, eye balling shops, chatting with locals and letting the boat rest for a few hours seems to come natural.

Remember, half the reason you are sailing around is to meet people and check out the local scene.

What strikes me with yacht design is that more than 50 percent of all interior space is devoted to galley and saloon. This is a very poor use of space.

Id gladly trade the whole saloon, dinner table, settee, for a reading desk and comfy reading chairs. Yacht designers never ever give space to reading...
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  #88  
Old 12-02-2011, 07:29 AM
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Yobarnacle Yobarnacle is offline
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In defense of Tiny Turnips cerviche (similar to), he said raw smoked haddock. I was gonna let that pass, but I love smoked fish, and smoking cooks it. Ive never seen smoked fish that wasn't cooked by the smoking.He also said it was a substitute for bacalhau which was unavailable. Like Viking North, I was surprised. I find it all over the world. Anybody like sundried shrimp? Well, I'll shut up.
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  #89  
Old 12-02-2011, 08:07 AM
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Yobarnacle Yobarnacle is offline
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I agree with Michael Pierzga that a lot of precious space on mini yachts is devoted to activities that use a small percent of the day. The rest of the time it's just decor. Life in developed nations has changed. The kitchen table was once center of the home, and earlier, the hearth, when folks cooked in and heated with a fireplace. Then came color TV and TV trays. Then the internet and cell phones. Now everybody is runnng off somewhere else. Its important to have hot meals. But the appliances don't need permanent installation in built in cabinetry like the 1972 galley that was in my Albin.Now, the top loading fridge lid is my computer desk. Keeps my laptop cool. We pre-cook dishes and refrigerate, then warm in microwave in 2 minutes. Other than the coffee pot, our most used appliance is the blender. Again in use a couple minutes at a time. Little water, ice, sugar, and fresh fruit> non alcohol dacqueri. Refreshing and deliciuos. Favorite of my wife and I is cantaloupe also called melon.
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  #90  
Old 12-02-2011, 08:09 AM
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hoytedow hoytedow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yobarnacle View Post
In defense of Tiny Turnips cerviche (similar to), he said raw smoked haddock. I was gonna let that pass, but I love smoked fish, and smoking cooks it. Ive never seen smoked fish that wasn't cooked by the smoking.He also said it was a substitute for bacalhau which was unavailable. Like Viking North, I was surprised. I find it all over the world. Anybody like sundried shrimp? Well, I'll shut up.
Sorry. The word raw blinded me to the word smoked. OK then.
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