Boat Design Forums  |  Boat Design Directory  |  Boat Design Gallery  |  Boat Design Book Store  |  Thanks to Our Site Sponsors

Go Back   Boat Design Forums > Design > Boat Design
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Most Recent Posts Gallery Images Search

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-16-2011, 05:28 PM
Hornblower Hornblower is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Rep: 19 Posts: 5
Location: Germany
size of boat to get anywhere

Hey,

Im thinking about the size of my prospective boat. It should be a kind of small houseboat to go anywhere. It must enable me to travel every navigable waterway in Europe, even the smallest one. And this is my question: What is the smallest navigable waterway (river, canal) in Europe? Where is it and how small must a boat be to travel on it? And how about the rest of the world?

Im curious about your tips.

Cheers

Hb
Reply With Quote


  #2  
Old 09-16-2011, 07:36 PM
aranda1984 aranda1984 is offline
aranda1984
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Rep: 101 Posts: 63
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Samllest navigable river in Europe

With due respect ... take your pick...
Just look at the map. Your question is way too broad to answer it.

On the other hand, it is not the rivers, but the bridges (Paris, Amsterdam etc...) that will give you a head ache!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-16-2011, 07:53 PM
PAR's Avatar
PAR PAR is offline
Yacht Designer/Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Rep: 3666 Posts: 14,030
Location: Eustis, FL
Boat length and to a large part beam aren't you're biggest problems, but height off the water will be, as stated.

Aranda is correct, your question is much like asking, "which woman would make the best wife". As a rule, houseboats aren't well suited for cruising very far. To much windage and not enough consideration to propulsion, efficiency or sea worthiness.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-16-2011, 08:11 PM
Poida Poida is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Rep: 439 Posts: 1,138
Location: Australia
Par? A 20 year old nymphomanic that owns a bar!!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-16-2011, 08:28 PM
PAR's Avatar
PAR PAR is offline
Yacht Designer/Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Rep: 3666 Posts: 14,030
Location: Eustis, FL
Okay, no problem Poida, your wish is my command. Poooof, one bar owning, 20 year old, 350 pound, part time sumo wrestling, nymphomaniac, with a bar bell piercing using a real, 10 pound bar bell.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-16-2011, 08:30 PM
BATAAN's Avatar
BATAAN BATAAN is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Rep: 1139 Posts: 1,620
Location: USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAR View Post
Okay, no problem Poida, your wish is my command. Poooof, one bar owning, 20 year old, 350 pound, part time sumo wrestling, nymphomaniac.
350 pound but 9 feet tall.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-16-2011, 08:30 PM
BATAAN's Avatar
BATAAN BATAAN is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Rep: 1139 Posts: 1,620
Location: USA
Does this include the "narrowboat" canals of UK?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-16-2011, 09:54 PM
LP's Avatar
LP LP is offline
Flying Boatman
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Rep: 529 Posts: 1,048
Location: WNY
I don't know. What will 350 pounds fit through?
__________________
LP ----------
Bless the open minded people of the world. LP
"Your mother cheated. That's why you look like a plumber." Ender
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-17-2011, 10:53 AM
Thames Thames is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Rep: 15 Posts: 12
Location: Thames Valley, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
I think the navigable waterways in Britain are some of the narrowest in Europe. The maximum 'go anywhere' size is roughly 7' beam, 60' length, 2' draft and 6' above the waterline. Yes very long as the canals here were designed for our traditional horse-drawn narrow boats 300 years ago.

Even smaller would open up some lovely rivers and backwaters that are not considered navigable by most, but you can still get all over the country on the larger navigable canals and rivers.

There's no limit - the smaller and shallower the more places you can pass through.

I too want a small boat - the best I've seen so far are the micro-cruisers designed and built by Matt Layden of Florida or Sven Yrvind of Sweden. See www.yrvind.com and www.microcruising.com. They average about 15' length, 4' beam, 3' air draft (without mast) and only 6-10" water draft. But you'd have to build it yourself. The only plans currently available are for the Paradox by Matt Layden, in plywood.

The next size up you can buy very cheaply second-hand - a small yacht with a lifting keel or with twin bilge keels, for example a Hurley or Westerly about 20' long, which you can buy in England in good condition ridiculously cheap from 1000 up. Maybe 1' draft for a lifting keel and 3' for a bilge keel yacht. You must find one with the mast in a tabernacle, or fit a tabernacle which is basically a hinge enabling you to drop the mast down to deck level to go under a bridge. These are seaworthy boats and some types have gone right around the world. Search www.apolloduck.co.uk and specify 'Sailing Yacht'.

It's really a compromise between living space/comfort, and the versatility and range of your boat. More living space, headroom, and stability means more weight, deeper draft, higher freeboard and greater beam (all or a combination of these). How simple can you live?

(All measurements are in feet and inches sorry about that.)
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-17-2011, 02:04 PM
Tad's Avatar
Tad Tad is offline
Boat Designer
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Rep: 2214 Posts: 2,114
Location: Flattop Islands
I second the suggestion that the smaller the boat the more versatile she becomes.....

In the late 1800's John MacGregor popularized cruising in canoes, his Rob Roy design is 15' long, 28" beam, 9" depth, and weighs 80 pounds. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ma...28sportsman%29

As young men (1890's) Albert Strange and George Holmes cruised throughout Europe in their small "Canoe yawls" of about 13' by 3'4". Cassy designed by G. Holmes is an example. The main advantage of these very small cruisers was they could be easily shipped in a standard rail carriage. As they got older their boats got a little larger, around 19-21' by about 5'4".

http://www.canoeyawl.org/

Of course everyone's definition of "house" is different......

size of boat to get anywhere-cassy-001.jpg
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-17-2011, 02:30 PM
BATAAN's Avatar
BATAAN BATAAN is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Rep: 1139 Posts: 1,620
Location: USA
Here's a micro cruiser by Kees Prins of Port Townsend at the recent Wooden Boat Festival. It's a modified Iain Oughtred FULMAR dinghy.
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...all-cabin-boat
It's only about 15 feet long, yet has incredible sitting space below due to his clever folding seat/berths. I sat down there and it was like a La-Z-Boy, a real comfortable, down below seat. Yet the cabin top is very low and not ugly, there's a watertight lazarette, the mast and boom stow in engineered brackets for trailering or the low-bridge or long low tunnel passage, and all in all one of the nicest tiny pocket cruisers I've seen lately.
Hopefully he and Iain will have plans out soon.
Attached Thumbnails
size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.14.28-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.14.15-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.15.07-am.png  

size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.15.17-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.15.33-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.15.47-am.png  

size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.15.57-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.16.26-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.16.38-am.png  

size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.16.48-am.png  size of boat to get anywhere-screen-shot-2011-09-17-11.16.59-am.png  
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-18-2011, 02:58 AM
m3mm0s rib's Avatar
m3mm0s rib m3mm0s rib is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Rep: 31 Posts: 121
Location: GREECE
At sea, the length is irreplaceable. The larger a boat is better and more secure it .
__________________
m3mm0 SR ib http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kwlNk7-iSg
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-18-2011, 11:48 AM
Hornblower Hornblower is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Rep: 19 Posts: 5
Location: Germany
Hey,

thanks for your comments.

@aranda1984: Hight is not the point, the boat might have 2m or less above the water. So every bridge over a navigable (with motorboats not only canoes) waterway should be high enough.

@BATAAN & Thames: You are right, I am thinking about a design similar to the english Narrowboats. I hired them several times so I know the small locks in UK, allowing boats up to 2,10m width. I was wondering if there are smaller ones around Europe. And anyway as I do not live in the UK I am interested where the limits are in the rest of Europe.

@Tad & BATAAN & m3mm0s rib: I already read about microcruisers and canoes with sails, but as I plan to travel on rivers and canals a sailboat would not be my choice. A mast would trouble with bridges and a keel would trouble with shallow water.


Cheers.

Hb
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-18-2011, 12:23 PM
aranda1984 aranda1984 is offline
aranda1984
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Rep: 101 Posts: 63
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
European waterways and house boats

Hello Hornblower.

In Canada. we think different when somebody calls a watercraft a house boat.

We think of an ugly, rectangular, top heavy block with railings on top so that a lot of drunks can have fun on the roof.
(Not that long ago, one flipped over on lake Okanagan in BC, killing somebody in it.)

The English river barges are quite different, by comparison.

Depending on the country that you want to explore, their tourist information office will give you a data sheet on the bridge clearances on the specific rivers, the average water depth, navigable width etc...

I found one, covering the Danube river, just by google-ing the name. It's a few years old and it still lists a bridge in Serbia as a temporary bridge.

Good luck with your dreams...

Stephen
Reply With Quote


  #15  
Old 09-18-2011, 07:38 PM
Thames Thames is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Rep: 15 Posts: 12
Location: Thames Valley, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
I don't know the maximum dimensions for the European waterways but they are generally MUCH, much bigger than the British waterways. A boat that can fit in our canals can go anywhere in Europe.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mast size/material for little boat hospadar Sailboats 4 08-02-2011 01:39 AM
need help to find boat size and hull sidthecoolguy Boat Design 4 09-14-2007 06:57 PM
Sydney Hobart Boat Size SloopJohnB Sailboats 3 04-23-2007 04:30 PM
stitch an glue boat size.. hob_n Boatbuilding 9 09-23-2005 11:03 AM
What happens if I increase the size of the boat by 30% than the intented size abrahamg Boat Design 6 04-26-2005 07:09 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:33 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Web Site Design and Content Copyright ©1999 - 2014 Boat Design Net