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  #1  
Old 07-02-2010, 08:40 AM
Moby Nick Moby Nick is offline
Moby Nick
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Rep: 10 Posts: 4
Location: Rockford, IL
Low-Power Inboard Diesel Cruising Vessel

Hi folks! This is my first post here.

After sixty years of messing about in sailboats my wife and I are considering a low-power, trailerable, inboard Motor Cruiser. My current cruising vessel is a 28-ft Shearwater Yawl builf by Edey & Duff. I also own a 13-ft wooden Melon Seed Skiff and a 7-ft plywood Eastport Pram (the dinghy for the yawl).

I have pruchased a Bukh 10-hp single cylinder Diesel engine that was removed from a sailboat because the new owner simply wanted a newer motor.

Our yawl is powered by a 9.9-hp Yamaha High Trrust outboard, and it moves along so well that I want to continue using a comparatively low-power motor in a cruising vessel having standing headroom of at least 6'-2".

I've seen a number of motor cruising boats that were converted from sailboats, usually having a higher house. In the size range I'm looking for, between 26 and 30-ft LOAS, it is very likely that the hull i end up with will have been powered by an auxiliary outboard.

I haven't seen much ion the internet about propeller shafts, cutlass bearings, or shaft seals, other than stuff for high-powered, high-performance boats, and am hoping someone here might steer me in the right direction for something suitable for a simple 10-hp motor. Used equipmewnt would be considered.
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  #2  
Old 07-02-2010, 02:16 PM
Easy Rider's Avatar
Easy Rider Easy Rider is offline
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Moby Nick,
I'm not sure what you're looking for. Parts, a hull, a cheap boat w a bad engine?? Keep in mind 3-4hp per ton. If it's tall enough for you an Albin 25 could be an excellent choice. Albins use 22 to 40hp most of them over powered. Ten hp would deliver about 5.5 knots. The small Fisher uses 10hp. Dos'nt sound like you want to build but an old Atkin design may be perfect.

Easy Rider
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  #3  
Old 07-02-2010, 07:50 PM
apex1
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Welcome here Moby.

After being on the scene for 60 years we may assume you are in your 70ies already.

That might sort out the question of building a classical Atkin design. Though first class, when time and money are as abundant as the patience of the "admiral".

The Bukh you got is a proper "last forever" engine, sure.

But I havenīt got your question?

Buy, build, restore?

Regards
Richard
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  #4  
Old 07-02-2010, 09:33 PM
Moby Nick Moby Nick is offline
Moby Nick
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
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Location: Rockford, IL
Looking for a source for prop shaft, cutlass bearing & seal

I can find a boat for conversion. Actually my top choice will be if I can persuade the builder of my boat to make one more bare hull like I have now. It would yield a flat-bottomed, straight keeled, light-displacement "trawler" capable of 7-knots with 10-horsepower.

My 28-ft yawl weighs less than 4000 lbs on her trailer, and so is easily trailered anywhere, to eiother coast and back.

I know where there is a really sad Albin-25 that needs a 20-hp motor (it sits in the Chicago River with her former engine removed for extensive rebuilding). It looked attractive for awhile, but I think I'd be happier with something lighter suitable for 10-hp.
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  #5  
Old 07-02-2010, 09:45 PM
Moby Nick Moby Nick is offline
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That 4000 lbs for my present yawl includes 1000-lbs of lead ballast and - - -

the 4-wheeled trailer upon which she rolls down the road, so what I'm considering would really be 10-hp in a 2000-lb boat.

Internet sources for new props, shafts, bearings, & seals have little information about what engines they might be used with.

About all I know is that the 10-hp Bukh formally turned a 12" 2-blade prop on a 1" dia shaft.

I reside in Rockoford IL, about midway between the Mississippi River and Lake Michigan.
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  #6  
Old 07-02-2010, 10:49 PM
apex1
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Well,

you can have almost every design in your ball park for a song at present. ( and that will be the situation for the next century in the US)

So, why bothering with a new build something, which would have to be made into fitting your requirements?

Blow all the crap, and dreams, and buy a vessel fitting your needs! And buy it for a song! Better, get paid for taking it home.

There are vessels up to 50ft in the US I could get for a agreement of freeing the berth!

Regards
Richard
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  #7  
Old 07-03-2010, 07:34 AM
Moby Nick Moby Nick is offline
Moby Nick
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
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Location: Rockford, IL
Most displacement motor cruisers start with 20-hp engines andbegi

quickly move up from there to 50-hp and quickly escalate to much, much higher hp as the hulls morph into semi-displacement and planning types.

A double-ended US Navy 26-ft Liberty Boat uses something like a 40-hp motor.

As an "environmentalist" I'm interested in a trailerable 26-30-ft motor cruiser having standing headroom that will steam at 7-knots with a 10-hp motor.

My earlier plan was to power such a vessel with the same sort of 9.9hp Yamaha High Thrust outboard my Shearwater Yawl uses. However, during a vacation in Norway a year ago which included some delightful time on the Oslo Fiord in a relative's 23-ft Diesel motor cruiser I became infatuated with Europe's small single cylinder Diesel engines.
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  #8  
Old 07-03-2010, 04:30 PM
CatBuilder CatBuilder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apex1 View Post

There are vessels up to 50ft in the US I could get for a agreement of freeing the berth!
Because of the different between the "haves" and the "have nots", this statement applies to monohulls only. Catamarans are still extremely rare, in great demand from the "haves" and go for a fortune here in the States.
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  #9  
Old 07-03-2010, 05:28 PM
jonr jonr is offline
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That's easy - buy two monohulls and attach them :-).
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  #10  
Old 07-03-2010, 07:50 PM
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Easy Rider Easy Rider is offline
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Moby Nick,
I worked at Uniflite and on the 26' Whalers. Put in rudder ports, shaft logs and aluminum frame engine beds. A man in Everett Washington made a beautiful conversion that looked a bit like a Sea Dory (cabin only). You can guess the cabin was small but usually conversions aren't beautiful. I think it had a 14hp 2cyl diesel. Ideal. Two cyl is better (smother) and over powered means one runs at low throttle ..more pleasant. But not ideal power loading. The FG 26' whale boat looks like a perfect boat for you. They sure roll though.

Easy Rider
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