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Old 08-28-2014, 06:22 PM
sandpiper32 sandpiper32 is offline
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drawing needs scale

All I have for a drawing of my boat is a brochure, with a sailplan and a interior plan. Does anyone know how I can scale the drawings up or down to a convenient scale? I tried my architect's scale ruler and nothing quite fits. Thanks
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:34 PM
Ad Hoc Ad Hoc is offline
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If the drawing in the brochure has a given dimensions, such as LOA or beam then you can. You just use a 1:1 ruler measure the dimension known/given with the ruler on the drawing. Then divide the actual value given by the measured value. That's your scale.
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:44 PM
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Richard Woods Richard Woods is offline
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It may not be wise to scale from a brochure. they are often "for illustration only". Rarely are they "as built". Cabin roofs are lowered to make the drawn boat look sleeker, bunks are shown wider than reality. that sort of thing

Otherwise, scan it in and zoom it before printing it out

Richard Woods
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Old 08-28-2014, 07:02 PM
TANSL TANSL is offline
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sandpiper32, can you show us what you have and tell us where you want to go ?. Maybe then we can see if we can do something positive.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:29 PM
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rwatson rwatson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandpiper32 View Post
All I have for a drawing of my boat is a brochure, with a sailplan and a interior plan. Does anyone know how I can scale the drawings up or down to a convenient scale? I tried my architect's scale ruler and nothing quite fits. Thanks
If you scan the brochure and post it on this thread, I can import it into Rhino Cad, and Scale the outline to the required dimensions.

Its also then easy to put some dimensions on the drawings for reference
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:36 PM
Petros Petros is offline
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There is no easier way to do this without the use a photo copy macine with a zoom function. if you want 1" to the foot for example, you put an inch ruler on it, and than divide that number by the actual length. than set the copier to that amount of enlargement.

sometimes copiers can also distort the ratio of length to width as well, best to have several known dimensions to check against. really fancy copy machines can even allow you to zoom height and width independent of each others, usually you need to read the manual on how to find that menu on the screen.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:35 PM
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All this scan and scale stuff is silly. If you have a brochure, it's a production boat, so there's going to be plans, data, information about it, even if it's an odd thing.

Simply put, what is the make, year and model of "your" boat? Post this information and I'll bet one of us (55,000+ forum members) will know about it, or know where you can get information about it.
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Old 08-29-2014, 11:19 PM
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gonzo gonzo is offline
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AdHoc's post #2 explains it well. Measure the length of the drawing, get the actual length of the boat and divide. That is the ratio you multiply by to get actual values
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:12 AM
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PAR PAR is offline
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The problem with measuring from these drawings is, it's never accurate enough and more importantly where are the perpendiculars actually located. For example, lets say the published spec's show the LOA to be 20', but a tape measure shows the 1.5" thick extruded rub rail wasn't included in the LOA dimension published, so the actual LOA of this 20' boat is 20' 3". Three inches isn't a lot (1.5% of the total length), but if this is now going to become the base for the scale, all measurements will be off by this percentage. This gets much worse once you start to enlarge the drawing, thinking you'll be more accurate. The line weights will become so thick, you'll just be guessing where they actually are.

If the OP can tell us what the design is, it's quite probable we'll know it or know where to get information about it, saving any of these kitchen table scaling and drawings exercises.
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:18 AM
Jammer Six Jammer Six is offline
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:49 AM
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rwatson rwatson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PAR View Post
All this scan and scale stuff is silly. ......

says anyone who cant do it.

"scan and scale " technology avoids the anticipated problems of " line weights will become so thick, you'll just be guessing where they actually are" and "measuring from these drawings is, it's never accurate enough" if you use manual "kitchen table scaling and drawings exercises."

Computer scanning and scaling of an image is about 50 times more accurate, and easier to do than using dividers and pencils on what is probably a 12 inch illustration at best.




Sure, if you can get the lines drawings and sections of a commercial product - that's the best way, but good luck with that.
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Old 08-30-2014, 01:16 AM
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I'm assuming the OP doesn't have the ability to drop a background image, into some modeling software, so they'll take the brochure to the local office supply outfit and blow it up a few hundred percent and attempt to measure from that.

Unless it's something really odd, I'm betting I have it in my data base or can find it in someone else's.
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Old 08-30-2014, 11:02 AM
Rabah Rabah is online now
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Hi sandpiper32,
May be I can help you. If you do not have problem with money I offer to take the program Delftship Professional from www.delftship.net. If there are no such possibilities download program Free Ship plus from www.HydroNship.net. And in two programs there is a wonderful function which decides your problem. See enclosed Tutorial.
Corrected 2D views in three projections then can be increased or decreased /ZOOM/ or move /PAN/ together with model of the hull. It is possible to write coordinates for each point from the image. It is possible to save new images /approximately new model of the hull and the old image of the superstructure /. See at a similar picture for tow Burondi.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Tutorial01[1].pdf (2.99 MB, 3056 views)
File Type: pdf Tug 31,2m-Profile.pdf (133.1 KB, 158 views)
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:27 PM
TANSL TANSL is offline
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No need to complicate your life with tutorials and strange méthods. If you have the possibility of "inserting backgroung images" with any CAD program, as has been previously said, just take a measurement in the image, divided by its real value and that is the scale factor to apply to the image . This done, the image is printed and the plane is obtained at the desired scale.
Problem solved in three lines. If the OP gives us more information, we may be able to help better. I think, though it does not involve a tug, I would be able to help.
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:42 PM
upchurchmr upchurchmr is offline
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Try it, you probably won't like putting your hard earned money into plans drawn from a brochure.
Typically when you blow them up you can't even identify accurate lines for a known straight line.
Then again I tried it from plans I purchased and found the "illustration" was not even accurate on the drawing.

I'm with PAR on this one.

If you try it, you better be ready to refair all the lines you derive from the scanned image. And then you better hope you have the same idea as the designer did.

Lets see, the brochure is probably 6" long representing 20 feet full size. That is a ratio of 40/ 1. So if you miss locate a point on the sheer by .01 in the brochure (good luck with that) the shear can be .4" off.

I'm not putting my money into that information.

There is no question you can do what several people have said. What is not clear is the quality of information you get back.
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