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  #1  
Old 02-03-2006, 10:54 PM
glastront156 glastront156 is offline
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Best handling small craft in rough water: V hull, Cat, Trimaran, Pantoon, PWC?

Hello,

Theoretically, for the small craft (<16') which one handles the best in rough water (4'+) and most sea worthy -

planning V hull powerboat
classic sailing hull
planning Cat
planning Trimaran
jet-boat hull
mini-speedboat
Pontoon
or PWC?

Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 02-04-2006, 05:48 AM
icetreader icetreader is offline
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cat

It's one of those 'big' questions, and a full answer should begin with "it depends" and then be long and complicated but if I had to shorten it to one word I'd say 'cat'

Yoav
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  #3  
Old 02-04-2006, 10:17 AM
NiklasL NiklasL is offline
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Where my money is at.

I would say a monohull with self righting as a main property. Both in shape and ballast. There is a guy called Sven Yrvind who has done this and sails his "coffin" around every where. My guess is that that is the safest way.

Since it's light it is on the waves and with a sail it has calmer motion, even though its a bit slow for some ppl. (it can plane though)

http://www.yrvind.com/
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  #4  
Old 02-04-2006, 10:20 AM
NiklasL NiklasL is offline
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pic page.
http://www.yrvind.com/nuv_projekt.html#
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  #5  
Old 02-04-2006, 04:10 PM
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kach22i kach22i is offline
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Several people have told me RIB's (rigid inflatable boats) because of their extra buoyancy.

See thread:
http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?t=9271

Thread Sample:
http://www.e-inflatableboats.com/Rig...ble_Boats.html
Quote:
Rigid inflatable boats are the best performers, and hence, the most expensive. Their rigid fiberglass hulls attached to inflated tubes combine the lightweight stability and buoyancy of inflatable boats with the speed, maneuverability, directional stability, and fuel efficiency of rigid boats............................These features of the sponson provide enhanced sea keeping ability, better absorption of shock from waves on impact, easier boarding of other vessels, high visibility, increased swamp buoyancy, and increased stability while stationary and under way.
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  #6  
Old 02-04-2006, 05:13 PM
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safewalrus safewalrus is offline
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RIB's is good, anything with a big controllable engine like an outboard really!
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  #7  
Old 02-04-2006, 09:17 PM
KCook KCook is offline
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I suppose a RIB would fit under his "planning V hull powerboat" category? Anyhoo, my vote would be RIB or PWC. Expect to get plenty wet, no matter what the choice.

Kelly Cook
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  #8  
Old 02-04-2006, 11:21 PM
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marshmat marshmat is offline
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To start with: There is no small boat under 16' that will be comfortable in four-footers. There are plenty that are safe and controllable at various speeds, but do expect to get tossed around. My vote goes to a deep-V RIB for planing hulls, and something round-bilged with a full deck and self-righting ability for displacement hulls.
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  #9  
Old 02-05-2006, 02:17 PM
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Guillermo Guillermo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marshmat
To start with: There is no small boat under 16' that will be comfortable in four-footers. There are plenty that are safe and controllable at various speeds, but do expect to get tossed around. My vote goes to a deep-V RIB for planing hulls, and something round-bilged with a full deck and self-righting ability for displacement hulls.
I add to this opinion.
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  #10  
Old 02-05-2006, 06:06 PM
longliner45 longliner45 is offline
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In the fall at lake erie ,sailboaters go playing in rough weather to get the last hurra in . seems to me mono hull sailboats ride the best!
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Old 02-05-2006, 10:45 PM
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kach22i kach22i is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longliner45
In the fall at lake erie ,sailboaters go playing in rough weather to get the last hurra in . seems to me mono hull sailboats ride the best!
Lake Erie is typically short choppy waves - noticably more when the wind is up. Is this the same fall weather you are describing?

If so, then a more inclusive large "dunking wave" found in Lake Michigan or lake Huron (deeper lakes by comparison) should also be considered.

That short choppy stuff is just plain annoying.
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  #12  
Old 02-05-2006, 11:18 PM
longliner45 longliner45 is offline
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that short choppy stuff sinks supertankers....also your downeaster are real close to the sailboat hull design ;boats with some draft are better riding than tri hulls or cats in real serious seas .lake erie has shallow water and cold dense air in the fall , this makes for some larger waves!
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  #13  
Old 02-08-2006, 02:18 AM
glastront156 glastront156 is offline
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Thank you guys..
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  #14  
Old 02-08-2006, 12:52 PM
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terhohalme terhohalme is offline
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This has tested to work well up to 1.2 m high waves. LH 4.7 m, BH 2.5 m
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Best handling small craft in rough water: V hull, Cat, Trimaran, Pantoon, PWC?-cathar1.jpg  
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  #15  
Old 02-08-2006, 12:54 PM
antonfourie antonfourie is offline
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PWC I say as long as you don't mind being wet
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