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  #31  
Old 02-11-2015, 11:39 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Time to buy a router for trimming. Can't do the inside edge on the gunwhales cleanly using the planing and sanding method, So going to get a small hand held router this weekend with a trimming bit. I needed to buy one anyone so I'm happy with it.



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  #32  
Old 02-12-2015, 09:41 PM
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Easy Rider Easy Rider is offline
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gregkuiper that's what the screws looked like. I use them all the time buying them in boxes. Mostly building garages and carports. Sometimes I put flat washers under the small heads in soft wood.
What kind of plywood is that Greg?
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  #33  
Old 02-13-2015, 10:53 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Hi EasyRider,
Those screws are great. I buy them in the boxes as well and find that they work great. They are coated with something that supposedly will protect them from corrosion, but I won't have any exposed anyway.

I'm just using sanded 1/4 inch plywood from Home Depot. It's super flexible and both sides are really nice. About $29 per 4x8 sheet. I did have to look through them at the store to get the better quality ones out. Another type of ply that I would contemplate getting if I wanted to make a boat were you could see the finished wood are the 4x8 Mahogany door skins from Ganahl lumber. They are only abou $8.95 per 4x8 sheet and would just require some fiberglass on the interior side as well I believe.
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  #34  
Old 02-14-2015, 12:44 AM
Saqa Saqa is offline
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For that type of work, I like the wood screws with the square head slot. The bit grabs so well that the screws just have to be pried off if unscrewing and zero jumps and destroyed heads or bits
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  #35  
Old 02-14-2015, 10:37 AM
Moneymakerspy Moneymakerspy is offline
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Great build and thank you for your extra efforts in the documentation/pictures, written posts. I am new to this community but very much inspired by your progress here. Is it too much to ask if you could elaborate on some of the project details like time spent so far/overall, cost/budget expectations, skill barriers, and how much if any has the project inspired your son/others? Also, what has surprised you most about building this boat so far or has it been a predictable project experience? Thanks again for sharing, good luck and hope she floats.
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  #36  
Old 02-15-2015, 06:33 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saqa View Post
For that type of work, I like the wood screws with the square head slot. The bit grabs so well that the screws just have to be pried off if unscrewing and zero jumps and destroyed heads or bits
So true Saqa and very forgiving if you aren't an expert wood worker. I'd be in bad shape if I were using Phillips heads. They would all be stripped and I'd have to drill them out.
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  #37  
Old 02-15-2015, 06:48 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Hi Moneymakerspy,
Thanks for the compliments. Having a really good time on the boat. Going very quickly and now that I have figured out some better ways to do it, my next one should be much easier. Here are some budget and tip items on what I have done:

Time:
I started building on January 25th of this year. I have averaged about 1-2 hours a day four days a week on this build and have been taking my time since this is the first boat I have built. A small boat like this is nice because it's easy to flip and move around the garage. My next boat will be larger, and will range somewhere between 17 and 32 feet long. If its longer than 17', I"m going to make all the frames in my garage first and then assemble the boat elsewhere. Maybe rent a cheap warehouse for a couple of months.

I fiberglassed most of the boat today and could take it into the water this week, but need to get a small trailer first and decide on a paint scheme.

Cost:
Wood/Lumber $200
Glue $30
Screws $40
Fiberglass/Epoxy Resin $70
Fiberglass 6oz cloth $70
Bondo $18
Respirator $34

Skill barriers:
It is much easier to build this boat if you have a router. That way all the 1/4 plywood can be cut large and you can use a trim bit to make it flush. Also an electric planer is a must for fairing. I bought a cheap Ryobi planer and router for under $130 total and they work great. I have had minimal previous wood working skills and just found that if I measured the frames out correctly everything will fit nicely.

Mistakes/Unforeseen issues:
You have to be super careful when cutting out the notches for the chine log and sheer clamp. Your inclination is to cut out a gap that will fit the piece of wood. What you really need to do is have the wood sticking up higher than the gap so you can plane/fair it down. There were also a few areas where I gouged the boat with the electric planer, but was able to fix easily with Bondo.
I also made a mistake with the framing and the hull build up which gave me a little bit different angle on the port and starboard side near the keel. Easily fixed with Bondo, and a lesson learned.

Inspiration:
My boys, daughter, wife and father-in-law love the idea of building a boat and have had fun helping and watching me do it. The neighbors have also come over and love it.

Recommendations:
Buy a good $35 3M or other respirator. You don't want fumes frying your brain or dust clogging your lungs.
Every night clean up your work space. Makes every day much easier.
Make sure your cars aren't in the driveway or they'll get super dirty
Get a fan to blow out the garage while you are glassing the boat.

In addition I'm really happy with how the boat is coming out. It's a lot nicer than I expected and has motivated me to make another larger one in the future.
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  #38  
Old 02-15-2015, 11:48 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Busy day on the boat today. Got up in the morning and glassed most of the bottom after adding reinforcement strips. Flipped it after it had dried and added the port gunwhale and added flush mount fore and aft 1/4 plywood on top of the sheer clamp. I did this to create some storage as well as areas to add flotation foam. This was not in the original plans, but I saw it on some other boats and really like it. The bow will have two compartment with the forward one being all flotation foam. I'll work on the stern compartment after I figure out how much cut out I need for the outboard and the splash well.
All the ply is just in temporarily with screws holding the tops in. I'll remove, design the compartments, foam, seal and glue and then screw everything back in. As you can see I didn't even measure the boards. Just screwed them on and routed them out.














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  #39  
Old 02-17-2015, 09:15 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Today I worked on the front two compartments of the bow in preparation for flotation foam and started building a rear queen seat with a splash well. I'm not going to finish the splash well until I get a chance to measure an outboard and see what kind of depth I need for the cutout.
I'll put pics of the bow compartments when I've had a chance to work on them some more.







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  #40  
Old 02-17-2015, 09:47 PM
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Easy Rider Easy Rider is offline
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Today I washed and changed oil on two of our cars.

Looks like you had more fun.
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  #41  
Old 02-18-2015, 11:55 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Easy Rider View Post
Today I washed and changed oil on two of our cars.

Looks like you had more fun.
Yep, I probably did
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  #42  
Old 02-19-2015, 09:00 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Flipped the boat and glassed the rest of the hull today. I need to finish the hull before I can perform any more work on the interior.

Going to take about 2 weeks off of the boat build and finish up my camping trailer. I have a trip coming up in a couple of weekends and need that trailer ready.
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  #43  
Old 02-23-2015, 10:43 AM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Found what I think is going to be some great paint for the hull today. Bought a sample of Rustomleum's Oil based enamel in Hunter Green Gloss.
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  #44  
Old 02-23-2015, 12:15 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Flotation Foam

Decided that I'm going to use flotation foam in the bow, stern and possible under the floorboards. Learned today that saltwater's weight is 64 lbs per cubic foot and the foam I'm going to use is 2lbs per cubic foot which gives you 62 lbs of flotation. Since pine is lighter than water you already get some flotation benefit from that, and then you have to consider that fiberglass is heavier than water so you have a negative there.

I'm thinking that I can get 1.5 cubic feet of flotation foam in the box, 2 in the stern and maybe 1 more cubic foot under the deck if I choose to put a solid deck in.

Did some research of flotation foams and so far the following link has the best pricing including shipping which is even lower than what I can locally.

http://www.fibreglast.com/product/2_...oam_24_25/Foam

Last edited by gregkuiper : 02-24-2015 at 01:39 PM.
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  #45  
Old 02-24-2015, 01:53 PM
gregkuiper gregkuiper is offline
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Had some extra time today so glassed the starboard side gunwhale and tested out some expanding foam in the first bow compartment.

Really happy with the foam and it expands a lot more than I though it would. I'm also going to experiment with the Home Depot foam panels. I'm thinking about putting them 3 layers thick on the sides under the gunwhale and glassing in place. If the foam is dense enough I might even line the floor with it and glass over the top similar to a Boston Whaler.


http://www.homedepot.com/p/R-Tech-1-...5?N=5yc1vZbaxx



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