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  #46  
Old 10-15-2009, 02:12 AM
Alan M. Alan M. is offline
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A mixture of both. The hull panels and bulkheads were precut. From the sheer up I cut the panels myself.

To add a little difficulty I increased the sheer height by 180mm, for more headroom. (I'm 2 metres tall) So I had to modify nearly every bulkhead.
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  #47  
Old 10-15-2009, 11:28 PM
sailsocal sailsocal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan M. View Post
A mixture of both. The hull panels and bulkheads were precut. From the sheer up I cut the panels myself.
It is necessary to bevel-cut the edges of pieces that form curved sections, or do you cut everything at 90 degrees and just fill the gaps with epoxy?
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  #48  
Old 10-18-2009, 07:13 AM
ecflyer ecflyer is offline
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I am building a 47' pilothouse ketch out of cold molded wood. I have been working on it for 3 years and expect to launch in spring of 2011. I would enclose a photo but can;t figure out how to get it to this thread.

Have a Great Day!
Earl
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  #49  
Old 10-18-2009, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecflyer View Post
I am building a 47' pilothouse ketch out of cold molded wood. I have been working on it for 3 years and expect to launch in spring of 2011. I would enclose a photo but can;t figure out how to get it to this thread.

Have a Great Day!
Earl
From FAQ at the top

http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/faq...chment_explain
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  #50  
Old 10-19-2009, 06:55 AM
ecflyer ecflyer is offline
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OK, I'll try this. Here hopefully is some photos of my 47' ketch.
Have a Great Day!
Earl
Attached Thumbnails
Boat Building Projects Underway-026.jpg  Boat Building Projects Underway-017.jpg  Boat Building Projects Underway-019.jpg  

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  #51  
Old 10-19-2009, 12:28 PM
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rugludallur rugludallur is offline
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33ft steel cutter in Iceland

Me and my best friend Carl are building a Hout Bay 33 in Iceland, you can check our status on our web page, we also have a live webcam and a gallery section with more pictures than anyone could possibly want to look at.

Site: http://dallur.com/
Webcam: http://dallur.com/index.php?id=129
Gallery: http://dallur.com/index.php?id=44&tx...#91;showUid]=8

We started by buying the plans from Dudley Dix, then we decided to model the boat in 3D using Rhino 3D, then we decided that since we had the 3D model we should use CNC cutting, so we built a 2x6m plasma cutting CNC table from scratch, and cut everything for the boat. We also built the roller to bend all the flat bars/pipes, a kerosene burner to melt the lead and some other tools and parts.

It's about 7 years since we started the whole process and about a year and a half since we started welding the steel. We are mostly done with the steel work and are currently adding the stainless parts for windows, hatches, railing, etc. Hopefully we will be able to get it afloat next spring.

Jarl Stefansson
jarl@dallur.com
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  #52  
Old 10-20-2009, 01:33 AM
masalai masalai is offline
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So Manie, lots of inspiration there, get a move on
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  #53  
Old 10-24-2009, 01:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailsocal View Post
It is necessary to bevel-cut the edges of pieces that form curved sections, or do you cut everything at 90 degrees and just fill the gaps with epoxy?
Looks like Alan has missed your question. We are building the same boat (Bob Oram 44C) so he probably won't mind me answering....

The pre-cut edges (and most of the edges we cut) are angled at 90 and then filled with epoxy. Sometimes (but infrequently) we bevel-cut the edge, especially if access after joining would be difficult.

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  #54  
Old 10-25-2009, 01:04 AM
sailsocal sailsocal is offline
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Looks like Alan has missed your question. We are building the same boat (Bob Oram 44C) so he probably won't mind me answering....
Thanks Judy. In the time since I posted that question, I discovered your web site and read every single page. You and Tom have done a fantastic job building and documenting your project. Thank you for taking time to make this information available to other prospective boat builders.

I don't know if it was on your page, but somewhere I saw a comment that suggested that Duflex boats should not be permanently immersed, and that they need extended haul outs to make sure the core stays dry. Do you know what ATL's official position is on this issue?
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  #55  
Old 10-25-2009, 02:11 AM
masalai masalai is offline
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sailsocal,
Hi, - - I am building a smaller model to the Scrumble project... ATL advise that DuFLEX laminate is NOT waterproof as manufactured and MUST be carefully sealed (all the minute pinholes must be filled in and closed - several procedures achieve this), and once sorted makes a very light and robust hull.... That stays sealed if done properly...

Check out the ATL website http://www.duflex.com.au/duflex/ (all of it) and if you cannot find the answer, send them an email, and they will respond.... Bob Oram has several designs (power and sail) have a look around there also (Judy maintains his website?)... Judy knows far more than I will ever know on boatbuilding...

Link to my build and Bob Oram Design is in the "signature area" of all my posts
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  #56  
Old 10-25-2009, 02:15 AM
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judy judy is offline
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(Edit: Sorry Masalai, I didn't see your post before I posted this.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailsocal View Post
... somewhere I saw a comment that suggested that Duflex boats should not be permanently immersed, and that they need extended haul outs to make sure the core stays dry. Do you know what ATL's official position is on this issue?
This is the first time I've ever heard this surprising comment! As far as I know, all Bob Oram boats are permanently immersed. "Dog on Cat" is a 48' Bob Oram Duflex boat that has been sailing for over 10 years in tropical waters, with absolutely no core problems.

Hauling out a boat for "off-season" storage is not a common practice in Australia. So when ATL produce and sell Duflex for use in hull shells, it is with the assumption that the boat will remain in the water. This comment about Duflex on their website is worth noting:
Because of the end-grain characteristics, the balsa used in DuFLEX composites panels has good moisture resistance. Water does not migrate across the grain and damage is restricted to areas immediately surrounding the damaged areas.
Note that this is referring to "damaged" Duflex.

Of course, the panels must be sealed, including core replacement around any hardware or intrusions, during the build process.
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  #57  
Old 12-02-2009, 03:02 PM
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http://home.att.net/~schmidttl/boat_yard_26.htm
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  #58  
Old 12-03-2009, 02:46 PM
Alan M. Alan M. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailsocal View Post
I don't know if it was on your page, but somewhere I saw a comment that suggested that Duflex boats should not be permanently immersed, and that they need extended haul outs to make sure the core stays dry. Do you know what ATL's official position is on this issue?
FMD there's some drivel going round. The vast majority of Duflex boats live in the water full-time.

I've not heard of any core problems.

They don't pull this boat out of the water every day:

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  #59  
Old 12-17-2009, 03:47 AM
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Scrumble Scrumble is offline
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Links to boat building projects underway

Good Day Manie,

Even though we all love to talk about how good Oram designs are and Duflex is, here are a few links some may not have seen:

http://supercruiser.blogspot.com/
http://www.fram.nl/
http://www.saunalahti.fi/pekkajlh/boat/story_e1.htm
http://www.mahnamahna.com.au/
http://westsail42.blogspot.com/
http://rwf82raus.blogspot.com/
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  #60  
Old 01-20-2010, 02:56 PM
Alan M. Alan M. is offline
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A bit more progress:



We were lifting by the chainplates, and we told the crane guys the balance point would be just in front of them, but what did we know.....so the predictable happened.



Eventually we got them to use a spreader bar and a longer sling on the forebeam - this time a little too long, but it did the job - she can't be too heavy, a little Franna picked her up!



Backed the trailer under her.....





As the boat settles down on the trailer, the heart rate settles down to 200 or so...



And now we have a trailer boat!

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